Ootake Beach

reon

07-18-2005, 11:38 PM

If you don’t know already, today, the third Monday of July, was Marine Day in Japan (also called Day of the Sea or Umi no Hi) so we went to the beach yesterday (I know there must be a connection somewhere). :slight_smile: It’s not one of those outings that you planned in advance; we just bought food and drink from 7-11, got the Ibaraki Tourist map, and drove east to the Pacific Ocean.

So what is Marine Day? Here is an entry from the Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/) to answer your question:

The third Monday of July is Marine Day (Japanese: 海の日 Umi no hi), the 14th national holiday of Japan. It was observed for the first time in 1996 on July 20, after being declared a national holiday a year earlier. The holiday was moved from July 20 to the third Monday of July starting in the year 2003 in accordance with a Happy Monday Systems legislation passed in 2001.

July 20 was actually designated Marine Commemoration Day in June 1941 to mark the return of Emperor Meiji to the port of Yokohama in 1876 from a trip to northern Japan. However, it was not a national holiday, and so a number of ocean-related organizations got together in1991 to seek a holiday for the sea. Thanks to strong public support for the idea, July 20 was finally declared a national holiday in1995 after several years of debate in the National Diet.

Until the introduction of Marine Day, there were no Japanese holidays in the months of June, July, and August. The Japanese public was happy to gain a day off in the summer months, but the kids were probably the happiest of all, since they could now start their summer vacation - which frequently starts onJuly 21 - one day earlier, however, due to “Happy Monday Systems,” Marine Day may move between July 15 and 21, so recently, this happiness does not occur every year.

It’s a bit tricky to take pictures on the beach, especially of scantily-clad women and small girls. People might get the wrong ideas. So the camera mostly stayed inside the bag. And when I did press the shutter, sometimes I had to shoot from the hip. Sometimes this made interesting pictures, like of the boy bending down below, with a dynamically slanted horizon that wasn’t intended. But a lot of the pictures were crap. The decent ones I post below.

http://www.timog.com/gallery/files/5/boy.jpg
The day was mostly cloudy which was good; we were only slightly burned.

http://www.timog.com/gallery/files/5/ring.jpg
One of those pictures that I shot without looking. I had to crop it though.

http://www.timog.com/gallery/files/5/beach.jpg
The water looked chilly and it was (at least for me; everyone seemed to think it was fine).

http://www.timog.com/gallery/files/5/lifeguard.jpg
A lifeguard stands watchfully on the beach carrying a loudspeaker to remind everyone to stay inside the designated swimming area.

http://www.timog.com/gallery/files/5/boat.jpg
A boat. What is there to say? I just liked the way the sand looks.

http://www.timog.com/gallery/files/5/butt.jpg
I was shooting the girls swimming and this woman blocked the scene. Really.

http://www.timog.com/gallery/files/5/feet.jpg
What could be more boring that pictures of your own feet? And sand?

andres

07-18-2005, 11:51 PM

pards,

tinitingnan ko pa lang ang mga pictures mo, giniginaw na ako!!!
wala pa ring tatalo sa mga beaches sa pinas!
at uuwi ako end of the month! (yehey)

reon

07-19-2005, 12:07 AM

malamig nga, nabasa lang ako sa binti, nanginig na ako. brrr. pero mukhang enjoy naman ang lahat ng tao. pero wala talagang tatalo sa beach sa pinas, siyempre.

stanfordmed

07-19-2005, 10:13 AM

I beg to differ - in my opinion, the Hawaiian Islands have some of the best beaches! The islands also have different color of sands, from white to black sand. Not only the sand are nice, but the corals and ocean life are beautiful. I liked the Philippines beaches, but it’s unfortunate that most of the people are not eco friendly and not that safe for tourist. I do not see the Philippines on the world’s best
list though.

One example, when I was young, we used to go to one part of Ilocos where the beach was nice - clear water, white sands with shells, colorful corals and ocean life. I had fond memories of it. But when I went to visit it ten years later, it was a disappointment. There are no tiny shells on the shore, white sands are gone, corals are gone, and the water is murky.

My attorney before adores diving in different parts of the world and has a gallery of underwater photography. He had done some diving in the Philippines and expressed disappontment and concern about the people of the Philippines using dynamite to fish.

Indeed, the Philippines has beautiful places and a great potential of becoming a top tourist destination, but government and the people need to clean their act to keep it safe; nurture and take care of the environment for better future.

While I’m on my ‘soap-box’, people should avoid eating shark’s fin. :rant:
It’s cruel to kill sharks just for fins. :grrr:

Okay, I’m off my soap-box now.:rolleyes:

Top Beaches
Khao Lak Beach Phuket, Thailand
Poipu Beach Hawaii, USA
Matira BeachBora Bora, Pacific Ocean
Maroma Beach Mexico
South Beach Florida , USA
Pink Sands Beach Bahamas
Ipanema Beach Brazil
Biarritz France
St. Tropez France
Anse Sourse Beach Seychelles
Clifton BeachSouth Africa

World’s Best Beaches 1999-2003
(Listed alphabetically)
Anse Source d’Argent, La Digue, Seychelles (http://travel.discovery.com/convergence/beachweek/ansesource.html)
Cancun, Mexico (http://travel.discovery.com/convergence/beachweek/cancun.html)
Clifton Beach, Cape Town, South Africa (http://travel.discovery.com/convergence/beachweek/clifton.html)
Copacabana, Brazil (http://travel.discovery.com/convergence/beachweek/copacabana.html)
Crete, Greece (http://travel.discovery.com/convergence/beachweek/crete.html)
Datai Beach, Langkawi, Malaysia (http://travel.discovery.com/convergence/beachweek/dataibeach.html)
Fraser Island, Australia (http://travel.discovery.com/convergence/beachweek/fraser.html)
Grand Cul-de-Sac, St. Bart’s (http://travel.discovery.com/convergence/beachweek/grandculdesac.html)
Ipanema, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil (http://travel.discovery.com/convergence/beachweek/ipanema.html)
Kuta Bali, Indonesia (http://travel.discovery.com/convergence/beachweek/kutabali.html)
Larvotto Beach, Monte Carlo, Monaco (http://travel.discovery.com/convergence/beachweek/larvotto.html)
The Maldives Islands (http://travel.discovery.com/convergence/beachweek/maldives.html)
Maroma Beach, Mexico (http://travel.discovery.com/convergence/beachweek/maroma.html)
Mauna Kea, Hawaii (http://travel.discovery.com/convergence/beachweek/maunakea.html)
Natadola Beach, Fiji (http://travel.discovery.com/convergence/beachweek/natadolabeach.html)
Negril, Jamaica (http://travel.discovery.com/convergence/beachweek/negril.html)
Paradise Beach, Mykonos Island, Greece (http://travel.discovery.com/convergence/beachweek/mykonos.html)
Paradise Island, Bahamas (http://travel.discovery.com/convergence/beachweek/paradiseisland.html)
Patong Beach, Phuket Island, Thailand (http://travel.discovery.com/convergence/beachweek/patongbeach.html)
Phi Phi Island, Langkawi, Thailand (http://travel.discovery.com/convergence/beachweek/phiphiisland.html)
Pink Sands, Bahamas (http://travel.discovery.com/convergence/beachweek/pinksands.html)
Poipu Beach, Kauai, Hawaii (http://travel.discovery.com/convergence/beachweek/poipu.html)
South Beach, Fla. (http://travel.discovery.com/convergence/beachweek/southbeach.html)
Surfers Paradise, Australia (http://travel.discovery.com/convergence/beachweek/surfersparadise.html )
Tenerife, Canary Islands (http://travel.discovery.com/convergence/beachweek/tenerife.html)
Waikiki, Hawaii (http://travel.discovery.com/convergence/beachweek/waikiki.html)

Paul

07-19-2005, 01:17 PM

hi stanfordmed,

the philippines does have it’s share of beautiful beaches. thing is, the most beautiful ones are the ones that are not accessible. unlike hawaii whose beaches are accessible and well-developed, the beaches that are accessible to most people in the philippines are those already exploited by the developers and locals (can you say boracay?). try to go to palawan. your view of philippine beaches might change.

i agree with you though on the point that the government and the people should get their act together to preserve our environment and turn the philippines into a top tourist destination. what people fail to see here is that most of the local folks don’t even know that what they’re doing is going to cause larger problems in the future, most of them do it to survive from day to day. i believe education is the first step in preserving our environment, but how can you educate the people in numerous towns dotted along the shores of the thousands of islands that we have when even the children in the schools don’t have enough books and the few teachers we have need to have side jobs in order to provide their families with enough sustenance? there are NGOs and groups concerned with the environment that do this, but their numbers are very few.

i just saw a short documentary of one such project funded by a foreign organization to stop over-fishing of seahorses in a small town somewhere in the visayas. seahorses! the local people don’t even eat seahorses. so why the over-fishing? well, it turns out that dried seahorses command a handsome price in the chinese food market. and since the town is practically a haven for different varieties of seahorses (some endemic to the area), the smugglers (yes, smugglers, because it is now a crime to sell seahorses) found out and started purchasing them from the local folk whose only means of livelihood is fishing. so who’s the real culprit? the poor fishermen or the rich chinese in hongkong who created the demand for seahorses?

so if i were your attorney friend, instead of just being disappointed with the presence of dynamite fishing, i would look for a way to help those people find alternative means of livelihood so that they would stop this destructive fishing method. oh, and if he ever plans on going back to the philippines to dive, tell him to try to get on a divetour to Tubattaha Reef Marine Park. i’m sure that will be one of the best dives of his life, if not the best. it ain’t a Natural World Heritage site for nothing.

is this the beach you used to visit in ilocos? i took this picture 3 years ago. as you can see, it’s far from being a beautiful beach. it’s a public beach, hence, no cleaning, no maintenance, no money invested on it. aside from being a beach where anyone can take a dip in the sea, it’s also the parking lot of the fishing boats of the local fishermen. it ain’t no waikiki but it supports the lives of simple townsfolk.

http://www.timog.com/gallery/files/1/4/pagudpod.jpg

stanfordmed

07-19-2005, 03:29 PM

Many applause to you! Points well taken…:bowdown:

FACT:

Most of the Islands around the world have their own parts of prestine beaches. It’s a matter of personal opinion on which is best or worst.
So back to my soap box…

…the smugglers (yes,smugglers, because it is now a crime to sell seahorses) found out and startedpurchasing them from the local folk whose only means of livelihood is fishing.so who’s the real culprit? the poor fishermen or the rich chinese in hongkongwho created the demand for seahorses?
If the local folks are righteous, they shouldn’t be selling it to the smugglers. There are other means of making ends meet. Sometimes people are just plain greedy.

so if i were your attorney friend, instead of just being disappointed with thepresence of dynamite fishing, i would look for a way to help those people find alternative means of livelihood so that they would stop this destructive fishing method. The attorney is not my friend. He was disappointed that the government are allowing the people to use such destructive method of fishing.Don’t you agree that there are other means of fishing? Why do you think they use dynamite? Is it because they just want to use a faster or easier route of catching fishes? What’s wrong with using nets? It’s cheaper than dynamite - don’t you agree?

what people fail to see here is that most of thelocal folks don’t even know that what they’re doing is going to cause largerproblems in the future, most of them do it to survive from day to day. i believeeducation is the first step in preserving our environment, but how can you educate the people in numerous towns dotted along the shores of the thousands of islands that we have when even the children in the schools don’t have enough books and the few teachers we have need to have side jobs in order to providetheir families with enough sustenance?
Sometimes people don’t need formal education to know those things or to do the right things - wisdom is the key.I did not come from a rich family and I had my shares growing up in a province or barrio. There are other resources and other means of survival. People just need to learn to respect their environment.
Okay off my soap box…

wis·dom http://cache.lexico.com/dictionary/graphics/AHD4/JPG/pron.jpg (https://secure.reference.com/premium/login.html?rd=2&u=http%3A%2F%2Fdicti onary.reference.com% 2Fsearch%3Fr%3D2%26q %3Dwisdom) ( P ) Pronunciation Key (http://dictionary.reference .com/help/ahd4/pronkey.html) (whttp://cache.lexico.com/dictionary/graphics/AHD4/GIF/ibreve.gifzhttp://cache.lexico.com/dictionary/graphics/AHD4/GIF/prime.gifdhttp://cache.lexico.com/dictionary/graphics/AHD4/GIF/schwa.gifm)
n.

The ability to discern or judge what is true, right, or lasting; insight.
Common sense; good judgment: “It is a characteristic of wisdom not to do desperate things” (Henry David Thoreau).

  • The sum of learning through the ages; knowledge: “In those homely sayings was couched the collective wisdom of generations” (Maya Angelou). Wise teachings of the ancient sages.

    A wise outlook, plan, or course of action.

    reon

    07-19-2005, 08:32 PM

    pero wala talagang tatalo sa beach sa pinas, siyempre.hello paul at stanfordmed,

    please note that this is not a statement of fact. you may interpret this sentence as saying that philippine beaches are better than those in japan (not every beach on the planet). and even that is not necessarily true, because i haven’t been to all the beaches of japan and the philippines, and can only make generalizations.

    but i share your opinion that beaches and coral reefs in the philippines are being ruined irrecoverably. people use dynamite because that’s the most effective way for them to fish, otherwise they won’t. it’s sad, of course, but there’s probably nothing much we can do about it.

    stanfordmed

    07-19-2005, 09:34 PM

    :bowdown: I should get off my soap box…

    reon

    07-19-2005, 09:59 PM

    Dynamite is not the most effective way to fish, rather it’s the easier or lazier way.that’s what we think. apparently, that’s not what the fishermen (who use dynamite) think. besides, what’s the difference for them between “effective” and “easy”?

    if the fishermen think they’d be fishing for the rest of their lives, maybe they’ll start thinking about taking care of the sea. but for many of them, fishing is just a way to make money – to eat, to send their children to school, and then go to a big city, and then maybe out of the philippines (like us). do you think they’d care about eco-conservation?

    andres

    07-20-2005, 12:11 AM

    I have to agree with stanfordmed,
    Fishermen use dynamite for short-term economic gains. But in doing so, they wreak havoc on the ecosystem. No corals = no fishies = no monies.
    E di sinong talo???

    Palagay ko mga mangingisda alam naman 'to, pero meron lang talagang mga matitigas ang ulo!

    Pero ang pinakamasahol siguro ay ang muro ami:
    http://www.asiaobserver.com/Philippines/Phillippines-story2.htm
    http://www.upd.edu.ph/~film_institute/UPFI%20archives/philmovies/films/muroami/muroami.html

    [factoid: alam nyo ba na ang muro ami ay nagsimula sa Japan?]
    Pinagbawal na ngayon ito, pero hindi ko alam kung may gumagawa pa rin nito hanggang ngayon.

    andres

    07-20-2005, 12:23 AM

    On the other hand, I don’t agree with standfordmed’s list, hehehe.

    No doubt these are very famous tourist destinations. I have been to South Beach, and no doubt it’s one helluva a sexy place. Muy caliente desu!

    But these places don’t offer the tranquility you get at our own beaches, and there are a lot of excellent ones. Just don’t expect 5 star hotels though.

    Besides, Cancun = drunk American frat boys = not my idea of a good time!

    Paul

    07-20-2005, 02:26 AM

    Many applause to you! Points well taken…:bowdown:

    i don’t get it. why the applause?

    anyway, you’re right about the fact that it’s a matter of personal opinion on which beach is the best or the worst. which makes the list of 10 beaches you posted all the more insignificant. i’ve been to waikiki and all i can say is all the pictures you see of waikiki filled with beautiful people with sexy bodies is a lie. you should’ve seen all the fat, white asses i saw there (this is not a racist statement, it just so happened that all of them were white at that time). i don’t understand how people can call a beach beautiful when it’s lined with high-rise buildings. a secluded beach with fine, white sand and crystal clear water lined with coconut trees with no sound of any motorized vehicle within earshot is my idea of a good beach.

    now, with regards to dynamite fishing, the government does not allow it. it is prohibited by law. unfortunately, that same dysfunctional government whose so-called leaders are the ones responsible for wasting the people’s money, apparently do not have the budget to fill up the coast guard’s boats with fuel so they can patrol our shorelines and fishing grounds on a regular basis. i’m against dynamite fishing, but unless you show these people that dynamite fishing is not profitable and show them a better alternative, i don’t think it will stop. which is why there’s a need for education. i’m not talking about formal classroom schooling here. just to teach the people about the ecosystem and how it works, the dangers and long-term effects of destructive fishing methods and alternative yet still profitable ways of livelihood. of course, if all the people in our country were righteous, then we won’t have any problems at all, would we?

    oh btw, i think all of us here know the definition of wisdom… unfortunately, i’m one of those who lack of it.

    stanfordmed

    07-20-2005, 06:40 AM

    Paul,
    About the applause, that was just a spontaneous response - like an audience clapping after someone gives a speech.

    FYI: I was merely adding the wise qoute from Henry David Thoreau (“It is a characteristic of wisdom not to do desperate things”) under the wisdom and not necessarily the definition”.

    Andres,
    I don’t agree with the list either.

    stanfordmed

    07-21-2005, 04:12 PM

    all the fat, white asses In case you want to see more of “fat, white asses”: :eek:

    http://www.co.honolulu.hi.u s/cameras/waikiki_beach/waikiki.htm

    Paul

    07-21-2005, 05:22 PM

    nah, i’d rather go bird-watching. less traumatic. :smiley:

    stanfordmed

    07-21-2005, 10:59 PM

    This one’s for you then:

    http://www.pbs.org/saf/1201/video/watchonline.htm

    http://pbs-saf.virage.com/pbs-saf/icon/pbssaf1201/1130.jpg (javascript:playWin( ‘4’,‘pbssaf1201’,‘18 95395’,‘2687958’);)E ntertaining Parrots
    http://www.pbs.org/saf/images/virage_play.gif