Pact to allow Filipino health care workers in Japan OKd in June!

mikes511

01-19-2005, 01:01 AM

what do you think with this news, i hope this will push thru so that we filipinos can have a better life in japan!! cheers :slight_smile:

"The Philippines and Japan are expected to sign in June the Japan-Philippines Economic Partnership Agreement (JPEPA) which will pave the way for the entry of Filipino caregivers and nurses to Japan in exchange for fewer conditions on Japanese investments in the Philippines.

Philippine Ambassador to Japan Domingo Siazon said the two countries are just ironing out issues in the JPEPA, including the annual quota on Filipino caregivers who will be able to work in Japan."

Read the rest of the article here (http://www.mb.com.ph/MTNN2005011726584.html)

nick

01-19-2005, 01:30 AM

hey mike511, i moved the post to the appropriate forum. also, please don’t post whole articles from other websites. post one or two paragraphs, add your comment and give the link. :slight_smile:

good post, by the way, although i really don’t know how filipino nurses can work in japan without knowing japanese. construction workers, yes, but nurses? this probably won’t happen.

Dax

02-08-2005, 04:13 PM

good post, by the way, although i really don’t know how filipino nurses can work in japan without knowing japanese. construction workers, yes, but nurses? this probably won’t happen.
the way i hear it, them nurses are required to pass (at least) JLPT level 2 before they are allowed to come. sabi naman ng kaibigan ko, “wala akong pakialam kung marunong sila o hindi mag-nihongo. basta sana magaganda ang ipadala dito!”
:wink:

pointblank

02-22-2005, 02:31 PM

Just joined the Timog Forum 5 minutes ago - could not resist commenting on this caregiver/nurse issue.

May kasabihan na life is not a bed of roses - pag may good news, tiyak na may nakasabit na bad news diyan. The Economic Partnership agreement is not all apples for the Philippines. Ang isang kapalit para sa pagpapadala natin ng nurses dito ay ang pag-remove ng taxes on Japanese cars sold in the Philippines. At the end of the day, mas malaki ang mawawala sa atin from taxes kaysa sa makukuha natin mula sa suweldo ng mga nurses.

Yung nurse issue ay may malaking problema din. Hindi ganoon kadali na papayag ang Japanese government na maka-“infiltrate” dito ang mga Filipino health industry workers.

First, applicants are required to have a college degree or full educational training, after which they need to have “extensive” experience. Nurses are required to have nursing licenses in the Philippines. Only then will they be even be considered and screened for Japan.

Pagdating nila sa Japan, they will be required to undergo Nihongo language lessons after which they will be sent to Japanese health care or geriatric institutions to work as “apprentices”. Now this is the big catch: within THREE years of their arrival, nurse applicants MUST sit for and PASS the Japanese national exams for nurses which is given in NIHONGO. (This exam has a high mortality rate even among Japanese would-be-nurses.) Caregivers MUST take the caregiver exams within FOUR years.

If they pass the exams, only then will they be given official “nurse” or “care giver” visas, which are to be renewed every 3 years. If they fail, they MUST RETURN TO THE PHILIPPINES.

I think that many members of Timog Forum are fulltime students at Japanese universities. They can tell you that it is almost impossible to pass a national level exam after merely 3 years, specially one that involves highly specialized medical terms all written in Kanji!

In short, there is a very real danger that this program will end up to be just an endless supply of cheap uncomplaining labor for Japan’s old population: “poison dressed as candy” that the Philippine government, in its desire for immediate gratification, does not have the vision to see is not beneficial to us. :frowning:

nick

02-22-2005, 09:26 PM

Hello pointblank! Welcome to Timog Forum. I see you’ve posted thrice within your first hour! That’s probably a record. :slight_smile:

Sadly, your analysis of the “economic partnership” between Japan and the Philippines is probably right. Passing certification exams in Japan is hard, and probably impossible if you would start from zero with your Nihongo.

And if I’m a nurse, why would I want to come to Japan and go through all the trouble of studying Japanese to pass the exams?! I’d rather go to the US or Europe. (But that’s just me, of course. :))

pointblank

02-23-2005, 09:12 PM

Hello Nick!

Well yes, I think you are right. With the very strong demand for Filipino nurses in the US & Europe, I actually am wondering where we will be getting more to supply Japan.

I might be wrong, but I suspect that this has to do with the tenacious racial prejudice that Filipinos may still feel towards Japan. The Philippine government probably thinks it can just send the rejects (latak in Tagalog) that don’t make the grade in the US to Japan - not realizing that the Japanese have become far more choosy and sophisticated than Americans. Are they in for a surprise!

daddy_b

02-23-2005, 11:02 PM

If I were a nurse, I think I would be desperate to choose Japan as a possible place for employment, given that there are so many other, more lucrative and less inhospitable choices available.

Moreover, if a nurse has enough brains, he/she will be most welcome in any English-speaking country that needs his/her services. If he/she is mediocre and finds himself/herself in Japan, then that mediocrity will certainly keep him/her from passing the Japanese Language Proficiency Test, more so, the licensure exams, which will undoubtedly be in Japanese.

Japan is an option only for a desperate nurse. Just my opinion.

pointblank

02-24-2005, 02:29 PM

Meron pa ako isang worry dito sa pag-import ng Filipino nurses. Hindi kasi yan katulad ng Japayuki na pwede na ang patebol-table lang at minsang pahimas. Buhay ang hawak nila.

Alam niyo naman siguro na maraming doctor dito ang walang alam at pulos yabang lang. Maraming malpractice sa Japan na di lumilitaw dahil hindi kuwini-question ang authority ng “erai” na sensei. Ang nakakatakot dito, pwede na nilang ibintang sa kawawang Pinay nurse ang mga mali nila. Sasabihin nila na “ito ang instructions ko, iba ang ginawa, iba ang binigay na gamot.” Si Maria naman, baku-bako pa ang Nihongo, hindi niya madi-defend ang sarili niya.

Hindi ako magtataka kung within 3 years ng simula ng program na ito ay magkaroon tayo ng Japan version ng the Flor Contemplacion story!! :frowning:

KaLaBaW

03-01-2006, 09:14 PM

I heard that news to my teacher last week kasi im studying home helper/care giver level 2 here in japan, sabi nga nya philippine is the FIRST country na inallow ng japanese na mag work here in japan sa nurse or care giver, and im very proud because filipino daw nag pinaka mataas ang rating pag dating sa cere giving kaya na approved daw yan, but tulad nga ng sabi nila, kailangan talaga nasa bandang nihonggo level 2 ka kasi may exam pa para maka pag work ka dito, and japanese po yug exam, ako nga kahit level 1 na nahihirapan din po intindihin yung pinakita sa kin na sample exam, puro technical words po kasi, sa mga kababayan ko na care givers and nurses, GAMBATTE!!

fisher

03-01-2006, 11:39 PM

Just joined the Timog Forum 5 minutes ago - could not resist commenting on this caregiver/nurse issue.

May kasabihan na life is not a bed of roses - pag may good news, tiyak na may nakasabit na bad news diyan. The Economic Partnership agreement is not all apples for the Philippines. Ang isang kapalit para sa pagpapadala natin ng nurses dito ay ang pag-remove ng taxes on Japanese cars sold in the Philippines. At the end of the day, mas malaki ang mawawala sa atin from taxes kaysa sa makukuha natin mula sa suweldo ng mga nurses.

Yung nurse issue ay may malaking problema din. Hindi ganoon kadali na papayag ang Japanese government na maka-“infiltrate” dito ang mga Filipino health industry workers.

First, applicants are required to have a college degree or full educational training, after which they need to have “extensive” experience. Nurses are required to have nursing licenses in the Philippines. Only then will they be even be considered and screened for Japan.

Pagdating nila sa Japan, they will be required to undergo Nihongo language lessons after which they will be sent to Japanese health care or geriatric institutions to work as “apprentices”. Now this is the big catch: within THREE years of their arrival, nurse applicants MUST sit for and PASS the Japanese national exams for nurses which is given in NIHONGO. (This exam has a high mortality rate even among Japanese would-be-nurses.) Caregivers MUST take the caregiver exams within FOUR years.

If they pass the exams, only then will they be given official “nurse” or “care giver” visas, which are to be renewed every 3 years. If they fail, they MUST RETURN TO THE PHILIPPINES.

I think that many members of Timog Forum are fulltime students at Japanese universities. They can tell you that it is almost impossible to pass a national level exam after merely 3 years, specially one that involves highly specialized medical terms all written in Kanji!

In short, there is a very real danger that this program will end up to be just an endless supply of cheap uncomplaining labor for Japan’s old population: “poison dressed as candy” that the Philippine government, in its desire for immediate gratification, does not have the vision to see is not beneficial to us. :frowning:

That’s right Pointblank:D .

d_southpaw

03-04-2006, 11:39 PM

I also share the same worries. It is not as easy as attending intensive Japanese school for 6 months to 1 year and they will be able to pass the exams, and be able to get into good relationships with the people they will work with and the patients.

Mga arogante pa naman ang marami sa mga mangagamot dito - according to my own little experiences; at siyempre marami pang ibang factors.

If those of us who had been thru this - those who worked hard to improve ones Japanese language skills - can share their thoughts, and if there are a lot of us, perhaps we can send the concern at least to the Philippine embassy here.

Our current ambassador is also a ryugakusei (foreign student scholar) before, he knows how it is; but at that position, there are very strong political factors, that this very basic issue may be clouded under and become less visible to him.

ugnayan

03-05-2006, 03:12 PM

Sa Northwest Tokyo, may 2 kapitbahay akong Filipina na licensed nurses sa Pilipinas at nakapag-asawa ng Hapon. Ang isa ay may 2 anak at 9 taon na sya sa Japan. Mahigit 10 taon naman sa Japan ang isa. Sa tagal nila sa Japan at marunong na rin sila ng Nihonggo, mas pinili nilang magtrabhao na lang sa factory dahil mahirap daw ang mga Japanese medical terms at iba ang sistema ng hospital dito.

Ang kaibigan kong Filipina na nakapag-asawa ng Hapon (mahigit 15 taon na sa Japan) at kakakuha lang ng caregiver license sa Tachikawa ay maraming ipinaparating sa akin na mahirap talaga ang mga Japanese instructions at daily written report. Hirap sya sa mga kasamang Hapon dahil sa halatang “racial discrimination” laban sa kanya bilang manggagawang foreigner lalo pa Filipina sya.

What to do? :confused:

Maraming umaasa sa ating bayan na pupunta sa Japan. Kung ganito pala ang kapalit sa pagpapadala ng caregivers at nurses mula sa Pilipinas, ano ang magagawa natin para sa kabutihan ng kababayan at bayan natin?:cry:

d_southpaw

03-05-2006, 05:54 PM

Sa Northwest Tokyo, may 2 kapitbahay akong Filipina na licensed nurses sa Pilipinas at nakapag-asawa ng Hapon. Ang isa ay may 2 anak at 9 taon na sya sa Japan. Mahigit 10 taon naman sa Japan ang isa. Sa tagal nila sa Japan at marunong na rin sila ng Nihonggo, mas pinili nilang magtrabhao na lang sa factory dahil mahirap daw ang mga Japanese medical terms at iba ang sistema ng hospital dito.

Ang kaibigan kong Filipina na nakapag-asawa ng Hapon (mahigit 15 taon na sa Japan) at kakakuha lang ng caregiver license sa Tachikawa ay maraming ipinaparating sa akin na mahirap talaga ang mga Japanese instructions at daily written report. Hirap sya sa mga kasamang Hapon dahil sa halatang “racial discrimination” laban sa kanya bilang manggagawang foreigner lalo pa Filipina sya.

What to do? :confused:

Maraming umaasa sa ating bayan na pupunta sa Japan. Kung ganito pala ang kapalit sa pagpapadala ng caregivers at nurses mula sa Pilipinas, ano ang magagawa natin para sa kabutihan ng kababayan at bayan natin?:cry:

Ito pa ang talagang magagandang impormasyon. Konkreto at talaga magbibigay ng ideya kung ano talaga ang kalagayan sa trabahong caregivers.

The positive side of this is the opportunity, is probably very big and long term specially if so many Filipinos can overcome the very high hurdles. At the end of the day, I think it is worth for the Filipinos as a whole to aim and win this job market. Maraming growth opportunities bukod sa high financial gains, like thorough knowledge of another very important and highly valuable (economically wise) language, learning of the culture, contribution to the needs of an aging society…

But the philosophy “crossing the bridge when one get there” will most probably mean failure in this particular case.

It is really going to be very valuable that whoever is going to take this challenge, will b able to know what is the reality out there.

Bagyo pala ang tatahakin nila, hindi lang dapat rainy days ang paghandaan nila.

For sure, the policy makers up there, do not know anything about it at all. And not many can tell them. Kahit nga itong mga tao sa Philippine embassy sa Tokyo, mukhang bihira lang ang talagang may magandang understanding sa Japan.

Hope we can hear more from many.

kawai

03-09-2006, 10:25 AM

jobs abroad are supposed to be treated as ‘temporary solution’ to Philippines ailing economy. temporary that has gone permanently, and the rest is history. Now that the sending of entertainers to Japan has become a difficult task for the Philippine government to do, the gov’t is again pushing hard (and desperate?) for the realization of JPEPA via the sending of nurses and caregivers to Japan. But then again, these nurses and caregivers will be classified as ‘trainees’ while they go training (working actually) in Japanese hospitals and centers. As trainees, they will be underpaid when compared to Japanese national doing the same kind of work.

Japan is lucky for the continous supply of nurses and caregivers as ‘trainees’ while Philippine hospitals becomes more and more incapacitated in providing quality services due to nurse drain. Such is the reality faced by countries that rely heavily on the remittances sent by OFWs.

kawai

03-09-2006, 10:39 AM

as many of the displaced entertainers would say "it’s better to be inside the dark room of japanese clubs that be in the Philippines working to death for what? – the minimum salary. i bet, many nurses would say the same - three years of working in Japan as nurse is OK even if the salary is not as much as what the Japanese nurses received. it is much better than the Philippines anyway - 7-10 times higher salary! 3 years is a long way to save and earn for the self and the family at home.

i just wish that our policymakers realizes that finding ways to improve the economy is a more challenging task than the constant bickering and ugly debate done in congress in relation to issues that matter less to the majority of the Filipino people.

kimochi

10-14-2007, 09:37 PM

japan is the place for desperate professionals huhuhuhuhuhuhu:type:

thermometer

10-14-2007, 11:29 PM

japan is the place for desperate professionals huhuhuhuhuhuhu:type:
dude… watch out your word…hinde lahat ng andito na professional ay desperedo katulad ng iniisip mo… :slight_smile: ayaw mo bang makita ang kababayan mong professional na nag tatrabaho ng mahusay dito sa japan despite sa language barrier natin sa kanila…

…come to think always tayo nakakaintindi ng English at tagalog at karamihan satin nakakaintindi ng nihongo…pero bihira sa hapon ang nakakaintindi sa 3 language na binangit ko… the best pa rin tayo not a desperate

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