Teaching English in Japan

halloween

10-18-2005, 10:54 PM

(Moderator’s note: This thread was split from the thread entitled “How do you get a Japanese visa without sponsors? (http://www.timog.com/forum/showthread.php?t=111 5)”. Please continue your discussion but please keep on topic and be respectful of each other’s opinions.)

Yes, TESL means teaching English as a second language. Ang nasa isip ko ay Test of English as a foreign language, TOEFL. Also, let me correct “the only requirement” please delete the “s”.

I always encourage my friends and even casual acquaintances who finished college to try their luck and apply as English teachers here. Bakit naman hindi eh ito ang job na highly in demand dito. Hindi naman kasi required na English ang major mo or Education. Isa pa at mas importante, ang kailangan lang ay mahaba ang pasensya mo dahil talagang karamihan sa Hapon ay may low level of English proficiency. Sa tingin ko sa bagay na yan angat ang Pinoy dahil basically hardworking naman tayo at mapasensya. Halimbawa na lang, I have a student who had a hard time understanding the meaning of the word disappointed. What I did was to cite as many examples as I could. Nung pang-limang example ay naintndihan na nya. I doubt it if a foreigner from other English speaking countries would do the same. Walang halong pagmamagaling yon ha, opinyon ko lang.

“Those who are not qualified to teach English back in our own country really should not be attempting to teach English in Japan.”

I have a very simple answer to that Miss Pointblank. I am not really qualified to teach English in the Philppines because I am not an English major. My bachelor’s degree is Political Science. Why did I choose to work as an English teacher here? precisely because the minimum requirement as set by the Japanese Immigration law is only a college diploma and to that requirement I would say I am qualified. Also, they give premium to those applicants who graduated from a state university.

Japan and the Philippines have different standards in so far as the teaching profession is concerned. Hence, it is, in my opinion not safe to conclude that just because you’re not qualified to be an English teacher in the Philippines, you’re also not qualified to teach here. If Japan has the same qualifications as the Philippines, I would not even think of going through all the hassles of coming over for several interviews because I know for a fact that I am not qualified. It would be a total waste of time, effort and most of all money.

Also, I would like to point out that we are better off compared to those foreigners coming from English speaking countries. Their only edge is their accent. So if they have this opportunity, I dont see any reason why Filipinos who are more competent than they are to enjoy a greener pasture too.

By the way, I dont think I will make a career out of teaching because I really want to go to the US, that is if my application for a US visa is granted this December.

Miss Pointblank, I remember your comment on my inquiry about the plane ticket which I previously posted, wanna thank you for that. And please continue posting because recently I noticed bihira na kayong mag-post.

@Twinkle
If you need more ads, just let me know and I will send them to you. Just give me your e-mail address. Good luck sa 'yo!

c2ny2

10-19-2005, 02:41 AM

:frowning: … ayaw kong maging bastos at di ko rin intensyon na mang-away, dahil siguradong sasabihin na naman na naghuhuramentado ang mataray na si pointblank…

…but why does it seem that every Filipino thinks he/she can easily come to Japan to teach English? Just because the Japanese have almost negligible English conversation skills does not qualify a slightly more fluent Pinoy to teach them English. I would, in fact, be willing to bet that many Japanese will outperform Filipinos in a written grammar exam.

Aray ko po!:confused: Huwag nyo naman po sanang masamain ang comment ko pero sapalagay nyo po kaya ang isang Filipino na alam niyang hindi siya bihasang marunong sa English ay mag babakasakali ng pumunta dito sa Japan para lang mag turo ng English? Hindi naman seguro ganoon ka tang… ang every Filipino na nasa isip mo!:mad:

But to be honest with you madam,? (nga Ba?) may mga teachers diyan na hindi naman taga atin pero ang pronunciation ng mga words ay ang titigas talo pa yung mga kababayan natin sa bansang sentro ng Pilipinas.:love:

hunky

10-19-2005, 04:08 PM

Pointblank,

I believe you’re naghuhuramentado. You yourself suspected it so you denied it first of all.

I think you’re overreacting. Your comment is very discouraging, somehow offensive, negative, and the least amusing. We can be frank but not obnoxious. Oh, did you just say you’re “willing to bet that many Japanese will outperform Filipinos in a written grammar exam?” Come on, don’t you think that’s an arrogant if not a very risky proposition? When I was in college here in Japan, I can only count 2-3 out of 60 students in my class who can outperform in a written english exam a mediocre first year high school filipino student. Man, i’ve been studying here in Japan for almost six years now but my written Japanese is still as bad as their written english.:mad:

Also, don’t you think the Filipinos have had enough negativities thrown at them already? You could have said you’re supposedly factual generalizations in a much nicer way–to be considered a constructive criticism. Isn’t TF supposed to be a place for Filipinos (in/out of Japan) to help each other? I don’t know but I just hate it when someone aspires to do something then find himself/herself being doused with ice cold negativity and discouragement. I’m grateful filipinos like halloween find time to encourage, provide solutions to a problem, and help. The Philippines is in a very tumultuous state right now, the least we could give to our beloved countrymen back home–who will be happy just to get by-- is optimism.

By the way, knowing how to use the internet do not necessarily mean someone is educated enough to be grammatically correct. Remember that TF members can come from all walks of life, from the highly educated to the unschooled. This is the reason why everybody can relate to TF. That’s the beauty of it.

To the Filipinos who aspire to become english teachers in Japan, not having the qualifications to teach isn’t the end of it. It’s hard to compete wiht the native english speakers so if you really want to teach english here, strive to gain those qualifications and skills, and prove you’re more than capable of teaching english to the Japanese. Then heed Halloween’s advice. Nothing is impossible. More power!

Napoleon Hill, the author of the best seller “Think and Grow Rich” believed that criticising a person will most likely make that person try to justify his/her actions. I think I might have criticized pointblank so i’m expecting her to try to justify her comments. But I don’t want to argue so I rest my case.:smiley:

pointblank

10-19-2005, 09:49 PM

Hello Halloween,

Sorry for the unsolicited bomb; nothing personal here - it just happens that this “teaching English in Japan” topic is something that I feel strongly about.

Please note that being an English major is NOT a qualification for teaching English. Having an almost perfect command of English is. You can be a political science major, a chemist or a beautician - if your grasp of English is really good and you can explain what you know in simple terms to a student, then you are qualified to teach it.

Also, teaching English is not a matter of nationality - I will say the same things of blond Yugoslavians or even half-educated Americans. The focus of my post just happened to be Filipinos because the topic was of Pinoys coming to Japan to teach. As you can see from my previous posts in other threads, I am even more critical of “native” speakers who are native only in color.

Dear hunky,

Don’t worry, I definitely am not going to justify my comments. On the contrary, let me reinforce it: you are right, it is precisely my intention to discourage people who are not qualified to teach English (di lang Pinoy, pero kahit na Kano o ano pa mang nationality) from teaching it, whether here in Japan, in RP or elsewhere abroad.

One reason is this: to protect, in the long run, those Filipinos who are truly qualified to teach English. We all know that the Japanese are extremely prone to stereotyping. If you break a Japanese’s trust, it is extremely difficult to win it back. If you create a bad image in a Japanese’s mind, it will be very hard to change it.

When a English school in Japan or a Japanese student has a bad experience with an unqualified Filipino teacher (and they do not have another Filipino teacher who can serve as a comparative point of reference), we have effectively closed that door to qualified Filipino teachers who may apply later on. If many Japanese do not regard Filipinos as being equal to “native” Caucasians, it is not just a matter of skin color. It is a mistake to underestimate the English ability of the Japanese. Many of them are proficient enough to detect the flaws in the spoken English of many Filipinos in Japan. (How many times have I heard on the streets of Tokyo a Pinoy telling his Japanese companion sentences like “My brother going to Japan tomorrow.”) It is their daily experience with Filipinos (directly or through prominent Pinoys in media - like Melanie Marquez winning the Miss Intl contest here with “I am contented with my long legged”) that has shaped their view that we no longer speak English at a proficient level.

The second reason for my “huramentado” is even more important: the implication that teaching is an easy or light profession. “… computer engineer … gusto rin mag-apply dito kahit daw English teacher…”

I definitely do not regard teaching English (or any subject, even P.E.) to be below that of a computer engineer, whether in importance or ability. It is precisely this loss of respect our nation has for the teaching profession that is ravaging the education and upbringing of our children. 30 years ago, a teacher had near-absolute authority; now, “…ay, teacher lang yan…”

A teacher is entrusted with developing the knowledge of the pupils under him, whether they are kindergarten children or professionals learning English. A responsible teacher takes his task seriously - this is not something he should do even if he is not qualified simply because the opportunity is there to escape hardship back home. To make an exaggerated comparison - should we condone the smuggling of shabu because it is an opportunity to escape poverty? True, no law is broken by poor teaching - it is simply a matter of conscience.

Two final remarks:

About the grammar exam: have you seen the senior high school exams here? And are you familiar with recent “mediocre” high school students back home - not your exclusive school brats but those in public schools? I would not be so brash as to underestimate the ability of the Japanese. I recently received 2 messages - one from a new education graduate just appointed to a permanent teaching position in a public high school, the other from a UP graduate with a Ph.D. BOTH were sooooo poorly written that I had to re-read it 3x and almost rewrite it to be sure what they were saying. I’ve gotten better stuff from “mediocre” Japanese salarimen who send in their business letters for editing!

About Internet access & education. There is necessarily a link between having some amount of education and having the means to access the Internet. Much as we would like to pretend that Timog Forum is open to all, it is naive to think that that someone uneducated (implying here the financial inability to have gone to school) can actually find a computer terminal, log on to TF, then understand everything that has gone on in this thread! To be able to do that, he should have picked up some education along the way - even if it was in the form of self-schooling. If the membership of Timog Forum represents the upper 50 percent (I’m being generous since it’s probably something like upper 20%) of the Filipino population, and you are reading so many messages peppered with basic grammatical mistakes - what more the lower 50 percent? Where do we then get the moxie to claim that the average Pinoy can teach English? This was my point…

Anyveys, sa haba-haba ng post ko na ito ay baka i-ban na ako ng mga moderators, kaya sign-off na muna ako … and see you guys maybe in another full moon or two… :slight_smile:

likeable

10-20-2005, 02:57 AM

i agree with hunky. and tama pala si Napoleon Hill as quoted by hunky, i definitely smell “reinforced” justification all over pointblank’s reply. this is not to say i completely disagree with poinblank, rather some of her comments are true. naalala ko tuloy masungit kong teacher.:smiley: but i find some of pointblank’s generalizations short-sighted. while it’s true the filipinos’ english is deteriorating, i disagree that many japanese can outperform filipinos (not just yet).

About Internet access & education. There is necessarily a link between having some amount of education and having the means to access the Internet. Much as we would like to pretend that Timog Forum is open to all, it is naive to think that that someone uneducated (implying here the financial inability to have gone to school) can actually find a computer terminal, log on to TF, then understand everything that has gone on in this thread! To be able to do that, he should have picked up some education along the way - even if it was in the form of self-schooling.

a lot of 8-year old kids regularly use the internet but they’re not necessarily excelent in english. it doesn’t take much intellect to use the internet. i’ve been using the internet for as long as i can remember but i can’t say my english is perfect. in fact i’m still learning. learning takes time so pls be patient miss pointblank. i wouldn’t expect much from the members to be grammatically correct all the time, especially from what pointblank termed as “uneducated” or the less educated. you can’t expect a member who only attended grade school to have the english knowledge of an average degree holder in just a few months/years, let alone learning from surfing the internet. i still can’t write perfect japanese even though i’ve been studying in japan and surfing/reading or writing in japanese websites for 5 years already. i think i need 10 more years to master japanese.

pointblank’s imaginary evaluators will just waste their precious time if they chose TF to evaluate the filipinos’ english proficiency. TF is irreflective of that, unless the moderators decided to make TF a straight and correct english only forum site. nevertheless, i sincerely hope that all the members would learn to write perfect english/filipino.

Where do we then get the moxie to claim that the average Pinoy can teach English? This was my point…

who made this claim? i don’t think filipinos woud have the courage to make this claim. even the native speakers wouldn’t. just like you said, teaching is for responsible people that requires some skills not just knowledge. on the lighter side, an average filipino can teach if he/she makes the effort acquire the expertise or skills needed.

although pointblank clarified things about being a good (english) teacher, she has no right to admonish and give unfriendly remarks. how could you be so arrogant? some of us might not not be as good as what pointblank thinks she is in english but at least we don’t have any pretentions and hang ups. we can point out someone else’s weaknesses but we should refrain from giving unfriendly remarks to ourselves.

pointblank’s remark is full of pessimism and whining, i’ll take hunky’s unassuming optimism any day of the week.

gabby

10-20-2005, 10:39 AM

:frowning: … ayaw kong maging bastos at di ko rin intensyon na mang-away, dahil siguradong sasabihin na naman na naghuhuramentado ang mataray na si pointblank…

…but why does it seem that every Filipino thinks he/she can easily come to Japan to teach English? Just because the Japanese have almost negligible English conversation skills does not qualify a slightly more fluent Pinoy to teach them English. I would, in fact, be willing to bet that many Japanese will outperform Filipinos in a written grammar exam.

The days when we can claim that most Filipinos speak correct English are over. Just take a look at the pages of Timog Forum - these are people educated enough to have access to the Internet! With the current state of education back in the Philippines, many college students cannot even correctly construct a simple S-V-O sentence. (I know, dahil nagturo ako sa university!) Those who are not qualified to teach English back in our own country really should not be attempting to teach English in Japan.

By the way, TESL means “TEACHING English as a Second Language”…

Oh yeah! You know what my dear? I really hate Filipinos who love to give themselves air and graces just like you. You don’t really know the little fellow could speak better english than you do. Do you? Let them come and we’ll see if they have the stomach for the hostile environment of teaching English in Japan. And as for you my dear, I don’t know what floats your boat but you are really too big for your boots.

gabby

10-20-2005, 11:23 AM

Hello Halloween,

Sorry for the unsolicited bomb; nothing personal here - it just happens that this “teaching English in Japan” topic is something that I feel strongly about.

Please note that being an English major is NOT a qualification for teaching English. Having an almost perfect command of English is. You can be a political science major, a chemist or a beautician - if your grasp of English is really good and you can explain what you know in simple terms to a student, then you are qualified to teach it.

Also, teaching English is not a matter of nationality - I will say the same things of blond Yugoslavians or even half-educated Americans. The focus of my post just happened to be Filipinos because the topic was of Pinoys coming to Japan to teach. As you can see from my previous posts in other threads, I am even more critical of “native” speakers who are native only in color.

Dear hunky,

Don’t worry, I definitely am not going to justify my comments. On the contrary, let me reinforce it: you are right, it is precisely my intention to discourage people who are not qualified to teach English (di lang Pinoy, pero kahit na Kano o ano pa mang nationality) from teaching it, whether here in Japan, in RP or elsewhere abroad.

One reason is this: to protect, in the long run, those Filipinos who are truly qualified to teach English. We all know that the Japanese are extremely prone to stereotyping. If you break a Japanese’s trust, it is extremely difficult to win it back. If you create a bad image in a Japanese’s mind, it will be very hard to change it.

When a English school in Japan or a Japanese student has a bad experience with an unqualified Filipino teacher (and they do not have another Filipino teacher who can serve as a comparative point of reference), we have effectively closed that door to qualified Filipino teachers who may apply later on. If many Japanese do not regard Filipinos as being equal to “native” Caucasians, it is not just a matter of skin color. It is a mistake to underestimate the English ability of the Japanese. Many of them are proficient enough to detect the flaws in the spoken English of many Filipinos in Japan. (How many times have I heard on the streets of Tokyo a Pinoy telling his Japanese companion sentences like “My brother going to Japan tomorrow.”) It is their daily experience with Filipinos (directly or through prominent Pinoys in media - like Melanie Marquez winning the Miss Intl contest here with “I am contented with my long legged”) that has shaped their view that we no longer speak English at a proficient level.

The second reason for my “huramentado” is even more important: the implication that teaching is an easy or light profession. “… computer engineer … gusto rin mag-apply dito kahit daw English teacher…”

I definitely do not regard teaching English (or any subject, even P.E.) to be below that of a computer engineer, whether in importance or ability. It is precisely this loss of respect our nation has for the teaching profession that is ravaging the education and upbringing of our children. 30 years ago, a teacher had near-absolute authority; now, “…ay, teacher lang yan…”

A teacher is entrusted with developing the knowledge of the pupils under him, whether they are kindergarten children or professionals learning English. A responsible teacher takes his task seriously - this is not something he should do even if he is not qualified simply because the opportunity is there to escape hardship back home. To make an exaggerated comparison - should we condone the smuggling of shabu because it is an opportunity to escape poverty? True, no law is broken by poor teaching - it is simply a matter of conscience.

Two final remarks:

About the grammar exam: have you seen the senior high school exams here? And are you familiar with recent “mediocre” high school students back home - not your exclusive school brats but those in public schools? I would not be so brash as to underestimate the ability of the Japanese. I recently received 2 messages - one from a new education graduate just appointed to a permanent teaching position in a public high school, the other from a UP graduate with a Ph.D. BOTH were sooooo poorly written that I had to re-read it 3x and almost rewrite it to be sure what they were saying. I’ve gotten better stuff from “mediocre” Japanese salarimen who send in their business letters for editing!

About Internet access & education. There is necessarily a link between having some amount of education and having the means to access the Internet. Much as we would like to pretend that Timog Forum is open to all, it is naive to think that that someone uneducated (implying here the financial inability to have gone to school) can actually find a computer terminal, log on to TF, then understand everything that has gone on in this thread! To be able to do that, he should have picked up some education along the way - even if it was in the form of self-schooling. If the membership of Timog Forum represents the upper 50 percent (I’m being generous since it’s probably something like upper 20%) of the Filipino population, and you are reading so many messages peppered with basic grammatical mistakes - what more the lower 50 percent? Where do we then get the moxie to claim that the average Pinoy can teach English? This was my point…

Anyveys, sa haba-haba ng post ko na ito ay baka i-ban na ako ng mga moderators, kaya sign-off na muna ako … and see you guys maybe in another full moon or two… :slight_smile:

I still believe it is not for you to decide who is qualified and who doesn’t. Your profession does not give you the bullet to talk down to Filipinos who have the illusion that they could teach english anywhere. Leave it to the language school. As to the seemingly discriminatory preference of the Native Speaker, I think it isn’t really what it is. It is more the demand of the market than discrimination. The Japanese prefer native english speaker to get their money’s worth and to be with the KAKOI II GAIJIN.

If I were in your shoes, I would have gone back to the Philippines and try to do something about it instead of barking at the wrong tree. I suspect your intention was just to insult people and get yourself a boost by subtly telling us that YOU ARE AN ENGLISH TEACHER IN JAPAN. Your way to let us know that your English ability is a cut above the rest. Ain’t it Pointblank? That was poorly done Pointblank. You are too full of yourself. Certainly I have my own prejudice against my own race but not as shameless as yours.

halloween

10-20-2005, 12:16 PM

@ Miss Pointblank

While reading your reply, I couldn’t help but asked myself this question: Do I owe Japan any sense of allegiance so as to concern myself whether Filipinos applying as English teachers here are qualified? My answer: the hell NO. Besides, it would be too self-righteous if not blatantly arrogant of me to say that this so and so person is not qualified to teach English here. God, I wouldn’t go that far. As a foreigner here the most I can do is to follow Japanese laws and to that I would say I comply with no questions asked. I sort out my garbage, I pay my income tax, I stop when traffic light signals red and I don’t litter.

True, the level of English proficiency among Filipinos is deteriorating. My idol, Justice Isagani A. Cruz pointed out that it’s because young people nowadays are no longer part of the reading generation. Too many things preoccupy the youth such that they have lost interest to read good and sensible books. And to that I couldn’t agree more. However, what may be true to some may not be true to all. What am I trying to say here? Your argument is premised on the proposition that all those who are applying as English teachers here are ill-equipped to do so. Oh my, that’s a very dangerous proposition. I agree with what c2ny2 said. Have you read it? If not, I’ll quote it for you, “sa palagay nyo po kaya ang isang Filipino na alam niyang hindi siya bihasang marunong sa English ay mag babakasakali ng pumunta dito sa Japan para lang mag turo ng English? Hindi naman seguro ganoon ka tang… ang every Filipino na nasa isip mo!

I am sure I’ve been to school longer than most people and have read more serious books than an ordinary college graduate. Gee, I’ve been through hell in the academe. My contemporaries in the Philippines could attest to that. Malamang isipin nyo, aba at nagyayabang si Halloween. Hindi po, sinasabi ko lang as a matter of fact dahil ang napag-uusapan dito ay qualifications. But don’t worry, I wouldn’t go any further dahil hindi naman ako mayabang na tao at hindi rin ako nakapagturo sa university.

Hindi na sana ako mag-rereact kaya lang bigla kong naalala ang experience ko dito sa bansang Hapon a few months ago. Nagpunta kasi ako dito ng walang kamag-anak, kaibigan o kakilala man lang at ang nalalaman ko lang na Nihonggo words ay hindi hihigit sa 10 ( although ngayon mga 20 na siguro, hehehhe). All I had was my strong fighting spirit and the thought that God will not forsake me. Ang visa ko pa non ay tourist at habang umuusad ang araw ay nangangamba na baka ito ma-expire at maging TNT . Lalo na nung ma reject ang application ko sa isang school sa Tokyo. Tandang tanda ko pa, may isang Pinay na nag-comment ng ganto, “Mag-apply ka na lang sa omise kasi ang hinahanap nilang English teachers dito ay native speaker. Isa pa, sa omise, marami kang makikilala. Oh boy, that remark broke my heart and I was close to tears. Kapwa Pilipino ko ang di naniniwala sa kakayahan ko. Na imbes na palakasin ang loob ko ay dina down pa ko.

I wasn’t affected so much by what you said Miss Pointblank and why should I be, I already have a working visa. But my heart goes out to those Filipinos who are in the same boat as I was a few months back. Na dahil sa hirap ng buhay sa ‘ten ay nagbabakasakali.If you feel so strongly about the deterioration of the English language, I feel strongly about the plight of those who’d like to try their luck here hoping to enjoy a greener pasture.

The least we can do is to inspire and encourage them dahil pare pareho tayong Pilipino. Dito sa TF, may thread about solutions to the problems of the Phil. Ano nga ba ang magagawa natin para umunlad ang Pinas? Para sa ken kahit ang maliit na bagay gaya ng pagtutulungan ng bawat isa ay sapat na dahil wala naman tayo sa gobyerno para makapag-initiate ng direkta at malaking pagbabago. Lagi nating sinasabi sana ganito ang Pinas, sana ganon, puro wishful thnking. Bakit hindi natin simulan sa mga sarili natin ang pagbabago na imbes na mangmaliit tayo ng kapwa natin ay pagsikapang matulungan ang kalagayan ng kapwa natin?

Okay, I know this is getting longer, let me just say this message not only to Miss Pointblank but to those who’d like to post something here. Sana lang kung meron tayong sasabihin na makakaapekto sa damdamin ng iba, mag-isip tayo ng maraming beses bago ito i-post ng sa gayon ay hindi katakot takot na justification at pagpapaliwanag ang ginagawa natin later on.

hunky

10-20-2005, 03:48 PM

And are you familiar with recent “mediocre” high school students back home - not your exclusive school brats but those in public schools? I would not be so brash as to underestimate the ability of the Japanese.

@pointblank,

did you mean “your exclusive school brats” as “my” exclusive school? oh no, correction miss pointblank, di po ako galing sa “exclusive school.” as a matter of fact, i never attended any private schools. wala kaming pera para dyan. even in japan, i studied in a public/national university on scholarship. who’s underestimating the japanese? nobody here underestimates the ability of the japanese, on the contrary, i think you’re “overrating” them. this makes filipinos feel inferior toward the japanese so stop it, please. besides, this overrating and too much expectations are probably driving the japanese to get really depressed of failure then commit suicide. did you know that for the past 3 years the japanese recorded an average of about 31,000 suicides? this is horrendous!suicide may be a part of their culture but even the japanese goverment is alarmed.

mali na naman po ang akala nyo kaya sana naman bago kayo manghusga ay siguraduhin nyo muna kung tama ang pinagsasabi nyo. i sense so much frustrations in your remarks, cheer up! there’s so much to be thankful about–like filipinos never give up. filipinos should find what the problems are then try to fix it (not whine about it).we should stop complaining already, complaining exudes an aura of negativity that it makes everybody frustrated and feel sorry about themselves. did you know that some psychologists believe praising children and telling them the benefits of being good or excellent make them feel good about themselves and aim to be better? on the other hand, scolding children makes them sorry about themselves, discouraged, and frustrated then become more stubborn or rebel. there are exceptions to this conclusion but it gives us a subtler way of leading and nurturing.

i’ll just share my experience, when i was in grade school i had a teacher that i feared. she scolds and pinches my cheeks everytime she caught me speaking with another student. i did most of the things she told me to do out fear but i never liked her for that. on the other hand, if i did something bad, another teacher would just tell me it’s bad and tells me what to do and be good. plus, she kept praising my industriousness or even the small good things that i did. i felt good about it that i did chores voluntarily and felt the need to do better so i could reap more praises. this is the power of praise and reward, i guess.

with all due respect, being point-blank is sometimes dangerous it makes you prone to being a hypocrite. so let’s be careful.

oh, i proved to be a hypocrite. i said i’m not going to argue anymore about this topic but here i am. damn, i just ate my own words!:eek: :smiley: sorry, but i’ll try to be good anyway

nick

10-21-2005, 09:12 AM

Let’s tone down the rhetoric here a bit, shall we? I have to remind you that this is not a mailing list, but an open website, accessible by anyone with an Internet connection.

Isa pa, baka gusto ninyong mag-usap sa Tagalog? Kung hindi ako nagkakamali, may passage yata sa Rules and Guidelines na nagsasabi na gumamit ng Tagalog kung mag-uusap ng mga bagay na hindi maganda para sa Pilipinas o mga Pilipino sa Japan?

Raiden

10-21-2005, 11:00 AM

Nakakatuwa naman kayo, mga “kids.” :hihi:

Nagmukha tuloy paligsahan sa husay sa paggamit ng wikang Ingles itong thread ni Holloween. :stuck_out_tongue:

Kung ako sa inyo, kalimutan niyo na ang pag-master ng Ingles, dahil 30 years from now, either Mandarin or Nihonggo na ang universal language. :smiley:

Ni Hao Ma.

Ohayo Gosaimasu.

You know I’m just kidding, right? :open_mouth: or am I? :insane:

halloween

10-21-2005, 11:10 AM

Oy Raiden, di ako ang nag-umpisa non ha. Sinagot ko lang tanong ni Joy tungkol sa pagkuha ng Japanese visa ng walang sponsor. At nag-react lang sa sinabi ni Pointblank hanggang sa humaba ng humaba ang usapan at gawing separate thread ni Paul. Yon lang naman. Puro patawa nga ako dito sa TF eh dahil ako po ay isang masayahing tao. That’s all, I thank you. Bow!

v_wrangler

10-21-2005, 11:18 AM

Nakakatuwa naman kayo, mga “kids.” :hihi:

Nagmukha tuloy paligsahan sa husay sa paggamit ng wikang Ingles itong thread ni Holloween. :stuck_out_tongue:

Kung ako sa inyo, kalimutan niyo na ang pag-master ng Ingles, dahil 30 years from now, either Mandarin or Nihonggo na ang universal language. :smiley:

Ni Hao Ma.

Ohayo Gosaimasu.

You know I’m just kidding, right? :open_mouth: or am I? :insane:

OO nga ano. Madaming magagaling sa wikang ingles ah. Naks naman. Basta ako ala sa nasyonalidad yan. Hanggat alam mo na kaya mong gawin ang isang bagay, me bilib ka sa iyong kakayahan, at hindi di nakakapamerhuwisyo sa iyong kapwa, kahit saang larangan puwede kang makipagsapalaran - saan mang lupalop ng mundo. Hala!

Summer!

10-21-2005, 11:06 PM

@ Halloween…hello! Ibabalik ko yung sinabi mo sa akin sa isang thread…"very well said…lahat ng sinabi mo…couldn’t agree more” talaga…

@ Pointblank…hello din sa yo, pero sana hinay-hinay lang sa pagtataray kasi ang naging image mo sa akin e parang bading na wala na sa katwiran e naninindigan pa rin…lalo na nung way ng pagkakabanggit mo na nagturo ka sa isang university, hmmm…sounds so bading! for a while I thought you were, sorry ha, miss ka pala. No offense sa mga bading…baka may mag-react, uy, ang mag-react bading! hehehe…again, peace :smiley:

@ Hunky…natumbok mo…mabuhay !!!

di naman sa pumapanig ako pero talaga lang I feel for those Pinoys here who, like Halloween, really strived so hard para lang makarating dito, and many others.

likeable

10-21-2005, 11:37 PM

Let’s tone down the rhetoric here a bit, shall we? I have to remind you that this is not a mailing list, but an open website, accessible by anyone with an Internet connection.

Isa pa, baka gusto ninyong mag-usap sa Tagalog? Kung hindi ako nagkakamali, may passage yata sa Rules and Guidelines na nagsasabi na gumamit ng Tagalog kung mag-uusap ng mga bagay na hindi maganda para sa Pilipinas o mga Pilipino sa Japan?

gomenkudasai:)

makulit

10-22-2005, 03:26 AM

Sa sariling kong palagay, yung mga english teacher na proven worthy of their job should not take offense to what pointblank said.

Gusto man natin o hindi, may katotohanan naman talaga sa sinabi nya na may kababayan tayo na gusto maging english teacher dito sa Japan kahit hindi sila qualified magturo. Truth is yung iba pa nga wala naman talagang interes na magturo basta malaman lang na malaki ang sweldo ay okey na din, go naman sila, bahala na ang sabi.

Hindi ako aspiring teacher, at wala rin akong planong mag-apply magturo. Dahil na din sa hindi ako interesado, wala akong experience at palagay ko hindi ako qualified maging english teacher.

Kaya siguro hindi ako na-offend :smiley: Peace everyone! Huwag naman masyadong seryoso.

docomo

10-22-2005, 12:08 PM

on my personal opinion (batu-bato sa langit tamaan wag magagalit ha):stuck_out_tongue:

… I don’t see anything wrong with everyones opinion …fine ,opinion nyo yan … But you should remember when you quote somebodys opinion be sure na may basis kayo sa assumption nyo and ma-i-justify nyo yang opinion nyo ng walang halong personalan… ngayon kung hindi ganyan ang intention mo better stop quoting in the first place para walang problema … peace po:)

janieserq

10-22-2005, 02:13 PM

I agree…may kanya kanya tayong opinion…kaya nga lang be gentle naman sa pagre-reply ng mga quotes. Kung hindi naman makakatulong ang quote natin eh wag na lang tayong mag post ng comment ng hindi tayo makakasakit ng kapwa.

May kanya kanya tayong kakayahan, hindi na kailangang ipagsigawan ito. At huwag tayong masyadong mapagmataas dahil lahat ng ginagawa natin ay bumabalik din satin.

Christmas is fast approaching, let’s just give love to one another. Peace!!!

hunky

10-22-2005, 03:02 PM

sumimasen. although our comments were full of emotions as it may seem there is nothing pesonal about them. i think this happens every now and then in a forum. i personally do not know who i’m exchanging opinions with. if i did, i’d go fetch and give him/her a big hug after our discussion. after a discussion like this, i usually end up sighing and telling myself, “oo nga ano tama sya.” our exchanges wasn’t a bull session so don’t get too swayed/terrified by it.:smiley:

thanks

houseboy

10-22-2005, 03:35 PM

Masyado namang dinidibdib ang usapan dito. Daming nagbibigay ng kuro-kuro, dami ring nagkakampihan, nagbabangayan. Meron ding pinagkakaisa sila. Di ba sa pagtuturo ng Ingles sa bansang Hapon ang thread na ito?:rolleyes:

Kung magtuturo ka ba ng Ingles, ano ba ang mas importante?

  1. Yung perpekto ba dapat ang gramatika pero hindi naman naiintindihan ng kausap mo? :confused:

  2. Yung maturuan mo ng maayos yung estudyante mo na mai-esplika ng maayos ang kanyang gustong sabihin kahit mali-mali ang kanyang gramatika?:cool:

Kaya siguro may mga paaralan na kumukuha ng mga hindi nagtapos sa kursong Ingles dahil mas binibigyan nila ng importansya ang epektibong pakikipagusap. Meron din namang mga kinukuha ay may mga perpektong kaalaman sa wikang Ingles. Depende kasi sa pangangailangan.

Kung yung tungkol naman sa pagiisip ng bawat Pilipino na makapagturo, e nasa employer na yun kung iha-hire nila ang mga hindi kwalipikado na magturo. Kahit ba naman ikaw ay may Ph.D sa wikang Ingles pero ayaw naman sa yo ng employer e wala din naman patutunguhan di ba? Si halloween naman, kahit na hindi Ingles ang kanyang kurso e kinuha pa rin siya, so ibig sabihin nun e kailangan siya ng kanyang amo.

Sa mga Pinoy na gustong magturo ng Ingles dito, apply lang. Sana ay may mga mababait na amo na tatanggap sa mga kapatid nating Pinoy.

Teddy

10-22-2005, 03:50 PM

A little off topic, but… I heard some people in the Pinas say "open/close the lights instead of turn on/off the lights. I guess that is a direct translation for “buksan/isara mo ang ilaw”. I picked up that expression one day and used it for a while until I realized that it was Tagalog English:D (…right?:confused: )

hunky

10-22-2005, 04:03 PM

@teddy,

linguists would normally consider this as normal and not necessarily wrong. languages evolve:D

Teddy

10-22-2005, 04:10 PM

@teddy,

linguists would normally consider this as normal and not necessarily wrong. languages evolve:D

good to hear that:D

makulit

10-22-2005, 04:22 PM

Kung magtuturo ka ba ng Ingles, ano ba ang mas importante?

  1. Yung perpekto ba dapat ang gramatika pero hindi naman naiintindihan ng kausap mo? :confused:

  2. Yung maturuan mo ng maayos yung estudyante mo na mai-esplika ng maayos ang kanyang gustong sabihin kahit mali-mali ang kanyang gramatika?:cool:

nyahahaha!
sa no 1 ako. dapat perfect ang grammar. hindi maintindihan ng kausap kasi hindi marunong magturo. nyahahahaha …

ahem … serious na po ako … no 1 talaga. syempre kailangan korek ang grammar ng nagtuturo. hindi ako papayag na ang english teacher ng anak sa isang international school ay hindi marunong gumamit ng tamang grammar.

hunky

10-22-2005, 04:34 PM

nyahahaha!
sa no 1 ako. dapat perfect ang grammar. hindi maintindihan ng kausap kasi hindi marunong magturo. nyahahahaha …

ahem … serious na po ako … no 1 talaga. syempre kailangan korek ang grammar ng nagtuturo. hindi ako papayag na ang english teacher ng anak sa isang international school ay hindi marunong gumamit ng tamang grammar.

same here:D

adechan

10-25-2005, 09:56 PM

natumbok ko din ang huling message sa thread na ito.:smiley:

mabuti na lang at elementary level lang ang tinuturuan ko. Simple english communication, phoenics at mga children songs, chants, etc. etc. I don’t need things about grammar.

Pero totoo po medyo nakakasira po sa image sa mga qualified Filipino english teacher and aspiring english teacher ang mga hindi kayang mag turo.

Actually may problema po sa ibang Filipino teachers dito sa katabing bayan ko, mabuti na lang may mga magagaling na Filipino teacher pa rin doon, kaya hindi nila ma-generalize lahat.

Here in japan teaching english is not a matter of degree or qualification but the ABILITY to teach proper english. Pag AET (Assistant English Teachers) hindi naman na hinahanapan pa nang credentials, only interview, and in some case, they undergo examination, diyan po tayo pupuwedeng mga pilipino. Ang ALT (Assistant Language Teacher) ang alam ko pong qualified lang ay mga native english speaking teachers.

Teaching is fun for those who love to teach english. Pero hindi po ganoong kadali. Katulad po sa pamamasukan sa isang kumpanya, makikisama ka sa mga home room teachers. At hindi po lahat ay mabait at agree na ituro ang english sa japanese students. Ayun sa kuwento nang ibang kababayan nating AET, may mga ijiwarung teacher din.

Pag nagturo ka naman sa chugakko (semi highschool), pag natiyempuhan mo ang klase nang mga ala gangster ang dating, ikaw ang babatuhan nang libro. “Saken na eigo iranai … tsumanai.”

Kaya kailangan nang kaalaman kung paanong magturo. sa english ABILITY TO TEACH.

Teddy

10-26-2005, 03:03 PM

Kaya kailangan nang kaalaman kung paanong magturo. sa english ABILITY TO TEACH.

Tama ka dyan, adechan. How they can intrigue their students to learn is the key in teaching.

I always hated(still hate) math as a student, but somehow most of the math teachers of mine were so nice and respectful that I really worked hard at it and mostly got good grades in math.

Teachers can make students like something they don’t like:)

And I learned a large part of my English from my filipino friends back then when I was an exchange student in the Phils. In fairness, it’s not their fault that my English is not good.:smiley:

han

10-26-2005, 05:12 PM

next time you apply as an english teacher, and you are told that only native-english speakers are qualified, please refer them to UN which considers the Philippines as one of the only 8 countries that uses english as a native language. i came across this while i was doing research on a paper:

One is that the majority of ICT and technical courses, books and manuals are written in the English language. However, it is native to only eight countries: the U.S, the United Kingdom, Ireland, Canada; Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, and the Philippines. ( Source: UNITED NATIONS GLOBAL E-GOVERNMENT READINESS REPORT 2004)

adechan

10-26-2005, 07:08 PM

One is that the majority of ICT and technical courses, books and manuals are written in the English language. However, it is native to only eight countries: the U.S, the United Kingdom, Ireland, Canada; Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, and the Philippines. ( Source: UNITED NATIONS GLOBAL E-GOVERNMENT READINESS REPORT 2004)

thank you so much (((han)))
ang buong pagkakaalam ko, we are not considered native english speakers.

this will be a great help.

adechan

10-26-2005, 07:21 PM

Teachers can make students like something they don’t like:)
maganda ang naipakitang motivation sa iyo nang teacher mo

And I learned a large part of my English from my filipino friends back then when I was an exchange student in the Phils. In fairness, it’s not their fault that my English is not good.:smiley:

ako naman nahawa na sa japanese english, ang tagal ko ding hindi nagamit ang english language not til the time na may nag offer sa aking nang private english lesson some years ago, … medyo nag-re-review na ako nang proper grammar lately … i tried to copyread some composition for submission na medyo mahigpit ang criteria, aba eh santambak na error ang nakikita ko. Pag binabasa ko nga ang mga posts ko sa blog ko … na pa pa tsk tsk ako

:slight_smile:

adechan

10-26-2005, 07:37 PM

Masyado namang dinidibdib ang usapan dito. Daming nagbibigay ng kuro-kuro, dami ring nagkakampihan, nagbabangayan. Meron ding pinagkakaisa sila. Di ba sa pagtuturo ng Ingles sa bansang Hapon ang thread na ito?:rolleyes:

Kung magtuturo ka ba ng Ingles, ano ba ang mas importante?

  1. Yung perpekto ba dapat ang gramatika pero hindi naman naiintindihan ng kausap mo? :confused:

[I]2. Yung maturuan mo ng maayos yung estudyante mo na mai-esplika ng maayos ang kanyang gustong sabihin kahit mali-mali ang kanyang

PAREHO.

  1. If teacher is speaking, she/he should speak in proper english grammar, even the students don’t know the meaning.

sa no. 2 ang pagkakaintindi ko dito ay para sa student.

To express in english even the grammar is wrong, ay walang problema. That is only the start. But as teacher, kailangang i-point out kung saan mali ang sentence niya at usage of vocobulary words, even the pronunciation. We cannot expect anyone, of any culture even filipinos, to speak perfect grammar right away. To express in english kahit mali mali is a good sign of learning.

:slight_smile:

halloween

03-21-2006, 02:32 AM

Isang maliit na trivia lang mga kapatid. I share ko lang 'to kasi kapag nababasa ko eh di ko maiwasang di maalala yung idol ko si Justice Isagani Cruz nung time na nagkukumahog akong estudyante nya. Galit na galit kasi yon kapag wrong grammar ang sagot. Sabi nya ang wastong pag gamit daw ng regard ay ganto- kapag as may s kapag with regard no s so as regards at with regard.

That’s all, I thank you.

ugnayan

03-21-2006, 01:16 PM

Ngayon ko lang nabasa ang thread na ito at lahat ng posts ay talaga nga naman na inintindi ko.:slight_smile: Parehas kami ni Halloween ang tinapos at pinanggalingan na unibersidad; doble major lang ako at pumadpad sa MA.

Well, last day of classes sa YMCA kahapon at ngayon marami na akong oras sa pagbabasa at pagsusulat sa TF at sa 2 aklat pa na tinatapos ko!

I just would like to share the great feeling of signing a lot of Certificates for those who succesfully finished the YMCA school term 2005-2006. Bilang Filipino, napakagandang “privilige” na ako ang pinili na mag-sign sa mga Certificate of English School Completion kahit na part-time lang ako dito kaya naman full name ang isinulat ko. :sssh: Halatang Filipino ang apelyido ko at alam lahat galing ako sa Republic of the Philippines.

Isang klase lang ang gusto kong ituro noon pero binigyan ako ng 12 classes at sa 3 branches pa. Kahapon hiniling ako na dagdagan pa ang klase sa susunod na school year (April 2006-March 2007) at tulungan ako sa pagkakaroon ng Permanent Residency.

Pumunta rin ako sa Japan na walang kamag-anak o kakilala except ang kasama ko sa NGO ng ngayon ay nasa Amerika. Hanggang ngayon ay nagkakabisa ako dahil sa NGO & church-related programs. Noong mag-5 taon ako sa Japan ay inalok ako ng Immigration na mag-Permanent Residency pero pinili ko na mag-attend ng mga international conferences sa iba’t-ibang bansa…Ngayon iba na ang patakaran at talagang mahirap na raw ang magkaroon ng PR pero binigyan pa rin ako ng oportunidad ng Japanese Immigration.

Nasa aking paniniwala na nasa kamay lahat ng Diyos ang buhay natin. Kung loobin Nya na dito tayo sa Japan ay Siya ang gagawa ng paraan. Sa kabutihan Nya ay hindi tataliwas sa Kanyang pamamaraan! Sa mata ng tao ay hindi pwede ang sitwasyon ko sa Japan na mamuhay ng 14 apat na taon na (single pa po ako:shutup:) …Tapat ang ating Diyos na Siya ang tumawag sa akin dito sa Japan at Siya rin ang magbibigay ng lahat ng aking pangangailangan pati ang mga legal na bagay. Hindi rin Siya nagkamali na Filipino ako na dinala Nya sa bansang Hapon!

I’m really blessed to be a blessing to others–Filipino, Japanese or anyone! What’s fun in my travels in about 25 countries now is the recognition of foreigners to you–a smiling, diligent Filipino Christian!

God’s blessings to all!:halo:

halloween

05-21-2006, 11:53 AM

I post ko sana ito sa thread ni kikkoman na English 101 dahil mas appropriate pero since closed na, dito na lang.

Ano ba ang mas tama sa dalawa: what is the day today or what day is it today?
Mali ba na sabihing do you have many homeworks? Mali ba ang paggamit ng salitang many? dapat ba a lot?
Di ba since adjective ang word na “delicious” okay lang na sabihing very delicious? o mali ito?

Salamat po sa clarification.

chris_rock

05-21-2006, 01:59 PM

  • ‘what day is it today’ sounds better. ‘what is the day today’ sounds like a word-for-word translation of ‘anong araw ba ngayon?’ or ‘anong araw ngayon?’. another option would be ‘what day is it?’

  • with regards to ‘homeworks’, it’s more appropriate to use ‘homework’ lang. the word ‘homework’ is an example of a non-count noun. these are nouns that only appear in a singular form.

googling it, non-count nouns are are usually things which cannot be counted, such as rice or water. Non-count nouns have a singular form, but when they are indefinite, we either use the word “some” or nothing at all instead of an article.

which leads me to this question; if non count nouns cannot be quantified; how come it is grammatically correct to say ‘a pail of water’…‘a platefull of rice’…‘a truckload of sand’.

  • many vs a lot …‘many’ is an adjective which denotes a large number or quantity. ‘a lot’ on the other hand, is an informal phrase which means more, many, often. i guess both are valid to apply, depending on grmmatical usage.

  • ‘very delicious’ is a valid application of an adverb modifying an adjective.

  • some sources culled from the internet

PILIPINAS

05-21-2006, 06:08 PM

Halloween-san, pwede magtanong. Is it wrong if I ask someone “What day is today?”, instead of “What day is it today?”. Thanks.

halloween

05-21-2006, 06:38 PM

@chris rock
Thanks for the clarification. About your question, if non count nouns cannot be quantified; how come it is grammatically correct to say ‘a pail of water’…‘a platefull of rice’…‘a truckload of sand’. That’s precisely the point. Since they can’t be quantified, you need to use quantifiers (?) to refer to them like the word “some”.

This leads me to ask, is it grammatically wrong to say moneys? I often read “some money” but I’ve encountered “moneys” to make it plural.

About the word “delicious” sabi sa 'ken ng co-worker ko mali daw na sabihing “very delicious” pero d na nya na elaborate for lack of time, in passing lang nya nasabi or nasabi man nya di clear ang explanation nya.

@Pilipinas
I think in the order of which sentence is grammatically correct, it would be:

what day is today?
what is the day today?
what day is it today?

I agree with chris, parang literal translation kasi ng anong araw ngayon which shoudnt be the case.

Opinyon ko lang, baka mali ako.

gemini_19

05-21-2006, 06:45 PM

About the word “delicious” sabi sa 'ken ng co-worker ko mali daw na sabihing “very delicious” pero d na nya na elaborate for lack of time, in passing lang nya nasabi or nasabi man nya di clear ang explanation nya.

so ano kaya ang tama? it’s so delicious ?

brownman

05-21-2006, 06:49 PM

i agree with halloween, if an uncountable noun has a quantifier it becomes countable because it becomes very specific.

regarding “very delicious”, isn’t it almost the same as saying “very good”. very(adverb) is just modifying delicious(adjective) . ang mahirap din kasi sa grammar nag-iiba ang rules pag written tska spoken. you can bend the rules when speaking.

halloween

05-21-2006, 06:54 PM

@gemini19
Tama ang very delicious. Same with so delicious. Kung gusto mo naman, delicioso, sabay ganto :food: , charing! joke lang po, di nga tama naman yon sa tingin ko.

PILIPINAS

05-21-2006, 07:42 PM

@Pilipinas
I think in the order of which sentence is grammatically correct, it would be:

what day is today?
what is the day today?
what day is it today?

I agree with chris, parang literal translation kasi ng anong araw ngayon which shoudnt be the case.

Opinyon ko lang, baka mali ako.

Thank you, Halloween-san. Sa uulitin…:wink:

chris_rock

05-21-2006, 11:05 PM

This leads me to ask, is it grammatically wrong to say moneys? I often read “some money” but I’ve encountered “moneys” to make it plural.

i’ve come adross the term ‘monies’ which in financial terms, (i think) is used to group currencies of different kinds lumped together as one. e.g. ‘monies of the world’.

gemini_19

05-22-2006, 09:24 AM

@gemini19
Tama ang very delicious. Same with so delicious. Kung gusto mo naman, delicioso, sabay ganto :food: , charing! joke lang po, di nga tama naman yon sa tingin ko.

thanks halloween, yan lagi kasi ang naririnig ko sa mga european client ko “very delicious”
i wonder na tama naman siya di ba? at susundan ko ng “is it sooooo delicious?” at pagka may pagka latin naman delicioso na rin:D

angelica

05-22-2006, 10:18 AM

:king: :yesyes: :tfrocks: Pointblank,

I believe you’re naghuhuramentado. You yourself suspected it so you denied it first of all.

I think you’re overreacting. Your comment is very discouraging, somehow offensive, negative, and the least amusing. We can be frank but not obnoxious. Oh, did you just say you’re “willing to bet that many Japanese will outperform Filipinos in a written grammar exam?” Come on, don’t you think that’s an arrogant if not a very risky proposition? When I was in college here in Japan, I can only count 2-3 out of 60 students in my class who can outperform in a written english exam a mediocre first year high school filipino student. Man, i’ve been studying here in Japan for almost six years now but my written Japanese is still as bad as their written english.:mad:

Also, don’t you think the Filipinos have had enough negativities thrown at them already? You could have said you’re supposedly factual generalizations in a much nicer way–to be considered a constructive criticism. Isn’t TF supposed to be a place for Filipinos (in/out of Japan) to help each other? I don’t know but I just hate it when someone aspires to do something then find himself/herself being doused with ice cold negativity and discouragement. I’m grateful filipinos like halloween find time to encourage, provide solutions to a problem, and help. The Philippines is in a very tumultuous state right now, the least we could give to our beloved countrymen back home–who will be happy just to get by-- is optimism.

By the way, knowing how to use the internet do not necessarily mean someone is educated enough to be grammatically correct. Remember that TF members can come from all walks of life, from the highly educated to the unschooled. This is the reason why everybody can relate to TF. That’s the beauty of it.

To the Filipinos who aspire to become english teachers in Japan, not having the qualifications to teach isn’t the end of it. It’s hard to compete wiht the native english speakers so if you really want to teach english here, strive to gain those qualifications and skills, and prove you’re more than capable of teaching english to the Japanese. Then heed Halloween’s advice. Nothing is impossible. More power!

Napoleon Hill, the author of the best seller “Think and Grow Rich” believed that criticising a person will most likely make that person try to justify his/her actions. I think I might have criticized pointblank so i’m expecting her to try to justify her comments. But I don’t want to argue so I rest my case.:smiley:

mika_0814

05-24-2006, 11:59 PM

hi gd evening sa lahat ng TF members. i’ve been out for quite sometime dami na pala usapin dito la ako knows.

anyway, wanting here to post mine. i hope some still remember me here.
pano ko ba sisimulan? sa dami kasi natamad na ako balikan kaya kng ano lang maalala ko to add infos. pasensya na kayo kung medyo late na ako sa topic.

una, ako na hire as english teacher not because magaling ako but because ung mga nauna na mga Filipino ay magagaling. secondly, hindi ako kasing galing nila. tama yung sinabi sa kabilang thread matigas ang accent ng ibang kababayan natin at isa na ako dun.
siguro mas malakas yung sinasabi ng iba na “luck” that i have now 8 schools to visit. 2 schools a day and i just work monday-thursday. a public senior high school sa umaga and private school sa hapon hanggang gabi. ang masasabi ko lang at pwede ko siguro i brag is my passion about teaching and i work by the heart. yup, am a professional teacher back home, a political science graduate, an undergraduate of LAW etc… i don’t like to mention na. i applied without any knowledge of japanese language…

sori ituloy ko na lang tomorrow ang aking dakilang speech ha mga ka tropa kasi 12midnight na may pasok ako bukas. don’t worry i wud jus like to inspire you again guys. see you tom… bye

chris_rock

05-25-2006, 01:48 AM

how hard is it to teach english sa japan? i’d like to give it a try.

halloween

05-25-2006, 11:05 AM

@chris rock[
B]how hard is it to teach english sa japan? i’d like to give it a try.[/B]

Madali lang, i. e. kung mapagpasensya kang tao kasi slow sila. If you’re going to compare the load of the teachers back home to the number of classes here, di ka mahihirapan.

Gusto lang ng employer ay neutral accent kasi I noticed foreigners coming from New Zealand and Australia have thick accent at di ito gusto ng employer kasi di maintindihan ng mga students lalo na ng mga bata.

It wont hurt if you try, kaya apply ka na!

Good luck sa 'yo!

tatamigurl

05-25-2006, 11:08 AM

Teaching english is not hard…its how to get the job…
If you want more infos, inform me…
got to go…may klase pa ko!
Good luck to you

chris_rock

05-25-2006, 11:14 AM

@tatamigurl, sent you pm :slight_smile:

mika_0814

05-25-2006, 12:58 PM

shortened period today kasi midterm kaya i have enough time to continue my piece. anyways, sagutin ko muna ung tanong kung mahirap ba mag turo. for me, napakadali probably because i have the experience but this is my very first time here in japan. sabi nga nila di kelangan ang experience as long as you have a university degree and ur english is native level everything will be fine. some dispatch company will give you the training some won’t. kaya hanapin na lang yung magandang dispatch co. kasi sa ngayon sa prefecture ko wala na ung direct hiring sabi nung iba pinag resign sila ng BOE at dun na lang uli mag apply sa mga company.

may mga schools na i really work hard meron naman na pa lakad lakad ka lang kasi sa 4 periods na andun ako minsan isang period lang ako mag lesson. meron din na kuha lahat ung 4 periods at 10 minutes lang ang break. i do not do the lecturing not even the grammar because the JTE will do that. ung part lang ng PFT(part time foreign teacher) or ALT(asst language teacher) ay ORAL communications. sa public school ito ha? kaya you have nothing to worry about your grammar. ibig sabihin ko dito hindi ka magtuturo ng parts of speech. ako ang ginagawa ko mga activities where the students really have to talk more. it’s a 70/30 arrangement.

in addition, i’d like to inform you guys especially those who have plans coming here to teach english that in my batch dominated un ng FILIPINO but very international. ung mga ka batch ko na filipino may IT, may civil engineer, one from UP diliman, may manang na, commerce graduate, med tech ay naku kadami.

kaya i’m here to encourage you to come if ul be given the chance. pagbutihin lang natin ang trabaho di ba? ang mga filipino naman eh ewan ko ba kapag nasa ibang bansa ang gagaling. one last thing, ang skill napagaaralan but never the talent. kung meron ka both pls. COME…

thanks. keep smiling;)

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