Are you proud being a Filipino? [Part 1 of 2]

Are you proud being a Filipino? [1] [2]

honey

09-04-2005, 10:06 PM

sa nangyayaring suliranin sa bansa natin proud pa ba kayo maging filipino?:stuck_out_tongue:

prettylily_1203

09-06-2005, 10:47 PM

oo naman. di naman dapat ikahiya ang pagiging pilipino natin kahit tambak ang problema sa Pilipinas ngayon…

honey

09-07-2005, 12:26 PM

I’m proud to be me!:stuck_out_tongue:

Raiden

09-07-2005, 01:05 PM

When I look in the mirror, and ask myself am I proud to be a Filipino, and see myself staring back at me, then my answer is Hell Yeah! :cool:

The way I see it, malaki ang potential ng Pilipinas na maging maunlad na bansa.
Ang pinaka malaking obstacle nga lang ay yung pagiging utak talangka (crab mentality) nung mga iba nating kababayan.

One more thing, yung “Me First, To Hell With Everybody Else” attitude. Kaya ang lagay ng Pilipinas ngayon, eh went to hell nga, figuratively speaking.

The best thing for us Filipinos abroad to do is always do our best to project a positive image of Filipinos through our deeds, actions and achievements.

And get rid of all those bad traits and habits. :mad:

Stacie Fil

09-07-2005, 06:29 PM

The best thing for us Filipinos abroad to do is always do our best to project a positive image of Filipinos through our deeds, actions and achievements.

And get rid of all those bad traits and habits. :mad:

Tumpak ka diyan !!! If one Pilipino who works in a company gain the company’s respect, his effort is not only for himself. He is also giving favor,raising up the value of the rest of the Phil. people. Tama yung sinabi mo na we should destroy that talangka mentality. If we see or meet another Pinoy who is an achiever. We should not feel inggit, treatened, or mayabangan. You should not feel na naungusan ka, as other often feel, instead you should think of ways to support and protect your kabayan. Another example; If he got into business and its blooming well, kalimutan mo muna yung turo sa business to grab some part of the market. Think of ways of how to support instead and lightened the load. In that way, sabay kayong aasenso at hindi babagsak.

tower23ph

09-07-2005, 08:16 PM

Im proud to be a Pilipino! Mga kabayan, sang-ayon ako sa mga sinabi nyo. Ang pilipinas ngayun ay dumaranas ng kahirapan dahil sa problemang pulitikal at pagiging makasarili ng ilan pero hindi naman un ang batayan para talikuran ang pagiging isang pinoy. Tayong mga dayuhan dito sa ibang bansa,sikapin nating itaas ang ating pagka pilipino sa paraang malinis at karesperespeto para naman malaman ng lahat na hindi lahat ng pilipino ay iisa ang pananaw at kaisipan.
Mabuhay ang Lahing Pillipino!

joeyboy1218

09-08-2005, 09:13 AM

thats the truth im proud to be a filipino, but not all the time…:open_mouth:

emperor

09-08-2005, 07:18 PM

Of course! I am proud to be a Filipino in looks, in words, in thoughts and in deeds.

Let’s start this movement of converting truly the filipinos in the Philippines and anywhere else in the world. Although you are here in Japan, you can still greatly help build the true Filipino image by just being you. Let’s stop finger pointing faults on others as we have done that before but rather let us start by accepting our own faults, and weakneses.

Let’s not blame others for what the current state of the Philippines and the filipinos is right now as we are a party to it. We have not done our part but merely criticizing our leaders, our brothers, and everyone except us.

May this movement progress as I hope it will.

My aspirations for the Philippines are: That most of the filipinos will have sufficient food at their table for three square meals a day. That most have jobs for the welfare of their families. That most filipino wives will not have to leave for work but instead care for the family. That families will again be united in prayer.

A Filipino is a happy person even in misery he can still laugh and joke. This makes a filipino a unique individual. Who cares to be rich if he can only enjoy the material things but not truly happy in his heart?

piNkAhOLiC

10-02-2005, 03:45 AM

with all the recent “wow! mali” in the arroyo administration, and all the other “kapalpakan” of our government, despite the fact that we are the no.1 laughing stock of the other countries, and even if we are always referred to as the banana republic, i am and will always be proud to be a filipino.

though i must admit that there came a time in my life when i hated anything and everything pinoy! it was just so disgustingly embarrasing to be in a country where all your countrymen work as entertainers and dancers, and yes, they do have families in the philippines! it was sooo disappointing and demeaning to live and study in a country where everyone belittles and even despises filipinas. and the worst, it was very frustrating to walk in a street of entertainment, where almost all shops hang philippine flags and proudly proclaims: HOT FILIPINAS INSIDE! FILIPINO ENTERTAINERS AVAILABLE! it was almost like proclaiming that filipinas are just like delicacies na pwedeng pampulutan!

yes, i studied in japan for a year and it was a torture to be a filipina. seeing all these, and hearing all the negative stories about the filipinos (coz most of the japanese thought i’m not), i vowed myself to prove them wrong, to change the image of filipinos, to let them know that there are more and far better things filipinos do other than dancing, singing and entertaining!

i know and i am well aware of all the bad things about pinoys but i am still proud to be one. call me a hypocrite, or liar, but i love being a filipino. i am proud of my nationality because i know that most of us don’t and it pains me to know that the philippines will be left alone in the ruins if we dont start loving what is ours. i am proud to be pinoy and i am actually loving it because i want to make a difference, to make a change. i am proud to be pinoy because i know that there is still hope in rebuilding the philippines.

a lot of filipinos hate the philippines. most of us are forced to take up nursing just so we could go out and seek “greener pastures” abroad. an average filipino’s greatest dream is to migrate to very rich countries. we are all escaping reality. our government officials can afford to be corrupt and inefficient because they don’t love our country, they belittle the filipinos, and in effect, they are reducing their self-worth as filipinos.

the philippines will never improve if we keep on loathing it. our government leaders will never change if we don’t let them know, if we will continue to be passive, if we continue to escape reality by going to other countries. we will never love and appreciate those thing that we never knew, the things that we don’t understand. so if we don’t even know the rich cultural heritage of our country, and our vast natural resources, and we only focus on the political scandals and whatever scandals we have, we will never learn to be proud of who we are–filipinos.

let me end by this quote by Sydney J. Harris:
Patriotism is proud of a country’s virtues and eager to correct its deficiencies; it also acknowledges the legitimate patriotism of other countries, with their own specific virtues. The pride of nationalism, however, trumpets its country’s virtues and denies its deficiencies, while it is contemptuous toward the virtues of other countries. It wants to be, and proclaims itself to be, “the greatest,” but greatness is not required of a country; only goodness is.

zpahc

10-03-2005, 07:34 AM

still proud being filipino since birth… pinoy 4 life!

pointblank

10-03-2005, 06:22 PM

Wala sigurong magsusulat dito na ikinahihiya niyang maging Pilipino, dahil siguradong uulanin ka ng attack messages.

It is so easy to claim that one is proud to be a Filipino - after all, mataas ang pride chicken ng Pinoy - so this question does not hold much meaning to me. Self-congratulatory feel-good answers lang ang makukuha mo diyan.

The more relevant and productive question would be: WHAT HAVE I DONE TO MAKE THE PHILIPPINES PROUD OF ME? Yan ang sagutin ninyo. Kung talagang proud kayo to be a Filipino and you want to make a contribution to the betterment of our country, ipakita niyo hindi lang sa salita kundi sa gawa!

honey

10-03-2005, 09:38 PM

kaya nga ang sagot ko I’m PROUD TO BE ME! :smiley:

v_wrangler

10-04-2005, 10:46 AM

kaya nga ang sagot ko I’m PROUD TO BE ME! :smiley:
Yan ang hinintay ko.:slight_smile: Pinoys abroad are too conscious about nationality. And that becomes more of a liability. Misplaced nationalism alienates us from our beloved hosts. Be proud to be yourself - be proud of your contribution to the community. Be proud to be a responsible citizen of the world.

betong

10-04-2005, 12:31 PM

Wala sigurong magsusulat dito na ikinahihiya niyang maging Pilipino, dahil siguradong uulanin ka ng attack messages.

It is so easy to claim that one is proud to be a Filipino - after all, mataas ang pride chicken ng Pinoy - so this question does not hold much meaning to me. Self-congratulatory feel-good answers lang ang makukuha mo diyan.

The more relevant and productive question would be: WHAT HAVE I DONE TO MAKE THE PHILIPPINES PROUD OF ME? Yan ang sagutin ninyo. Kung talagang proud kayo to be a Filipino and you want to make a contribution to the betterment of our country, ipakita niyo hindi lang sa salita kundi sa gawa!

Okay. That is another pointblank shot into the face of a lot of us. :slam:
So, how can I make the Philippines proud of me.
By showing other people my culture and my country and the beauty of my lupang sinilangan.
By trying to be an upstanding citizen in the country that has adopted me as their own while keeping my identity as a Filipino, and here in Japan, which may never adopt me as their own kin, by being an upstanding resident.
By trying to excell in the field I am in.
By voting.
And as a Pink die-hard fan said, by knowing the ‘rich cultural heritage of our country, and our vast natural resources’ or basically, everything there is to know about the Filipino’s and the Philippines. I believe in what she said, as I emigrated and studied abroad I came to realize that I really don’t know that much about my country. So, read, read, read and learn. How can you be proud of a country that you don’t really know. I grew up digesting all that Sesame Street, Hollywood, mainstream American culture gave me (what was considered as cool at that time was anything and everything ‘stateside’ right?). But as you leave your country, that’s when you start to think about your identity as a Filipino. And as we idealize everything foreign, especially those coming from rich developed countries like Japan and the US, I guess it’s easy to turn a blind eye to everything that is substantial around us, the poverty, our past, our culture, our traditions and embrace those that we idealize and forget about our identity.
:tiphat:

Dax

10-04-2005, 01:04 PM

Tama si pointblank! So ano ang mga nagawa ninyo para sa Pinas? Ako maliliit na bagay lang naman pero siguro nakatulong naman ng konti.

Some little things that I’ve done for Pinas: (sa totoo lang po)

  • Like betong, I have also introduced our culture (folk dances, food, children’s games etc.) to the Japanese and other foreigners in my former schools and in visits to local kindergarten, elementary, junior and senior high schools when I was a student. Most of the time I did those with other Filipino students, but I was alone in some. Thanks to those schools who invited us/me.

  • I wore my barong every 12th of June. This made my classmates (both Japanese and other foreigners) and teachers back then ask what I was wearing and thereby gave me a chance to give them a little introduction. I can’t do it anymore at work though, sadly, coz I’m required to wear a suit.

  • I don’t litter. I put my trash inside my pocket and throw inside the next trash box that I see.

  • I strictly obey the laws in both Japan and the Philippines. Including (kahit na mabusisi) little things like proper garbage separation and disposal, such as removing caps and labels from PET bottles and disposing as “moyasanai”.

  • I don’t buy food sold outside St. Ignatius Church. Ang bawal bawal. Last sunday sinita ng police na nakasakay sa bisikleta yung mga tumitinda. Sabi ng isa aalis na daw siya. Obviously palusot. Pero pagkaalis ng police nandun pa rin.

  • Like most of us, I send money regularly to my family back home. Kahit wala akong naiipon, simot ang sahod. Tinitiis na lang basta lang matulungan sila. (is this bad?)

  • In other international forums, I try to defend Pinas every time I think she is misunderstood.

  • I vote and will vote again in the next elections. Kahit na alam kong matatalo siya binoto ko pa rin because I believed in him.

  • I pay my taxes.

Some things that I need to do:

  • Be more punctual. I sometime come 5 minutes late at work.

  • Improve my knowledge and technical expertise in my field. I need to learn a lot more so that I’d be more useful when I go back.

  • To know more about Pinas, I need to learn another Filipino language (Cebuano and others are languages, not dialects).

  • To know more about Pinas, I also need to visit more places in our country like Mindanao, and other islands in the Visayas that I haven’t been to.

  • Ang dami pa! Sa susunod naman.

Next?

pointblank

10-04-2005, 02:07 PM

  • I wore my barong every 12th of June. This made my classmates (both Japanese and other foreigners) and teachers back then ask what I was wearing and thereby gave me a chance to give them a little introduction. I can’t do it anymore at work though, sadly, coz I’m required to wear a suit.

Actually, I’ve been wearing my barongs to work this past summer - nagpadala pa nga ako ng mga bago from RP - it’s sort of become OK to do so since the Japanese government launched the “Cool Biz” movement. E kung si Koizumi, naka Okinawa shirt nga. In fact, I tell them that I am not dressing down, since unlike the no-necktie look and other casual ethnic shirts, the barong is regarded as formal business wear in the Philippines.

Yes, Dax & Betong are right - we Filipinos do need to know more about the Philippines. We need to value our culture and history more. (I am sure that there are a zillion more pet dogs in Manila named Brownie or Blackie or Spot or what-have-you than Bantay! :smiley: )

Dax

10-06-2005, 11:13 AM

I’m waiting for the others to post the little or big things that they have done to make our country proud of them. Asan na kaya? :confused:

Some more things that I need to do:

  • Invite more Japanese (or other non-Filipinos) to visit the Philippines. I’ve only invited one, a school buddy back in 97, and it seems that he really really enjoyed his 20-day stay. :wink: Medyo napagod lang ako kaka-translate kasi kasama ko siya sa lahat ng lakad ko. :stuck_out_tongue: But it was worth it.

  • Be more active in our little scholarship foundation for bright but poor Filipino students.

it’s sort of become OK to do so since the Japanese government launched the “Cool Biz” movement.
Sa company namin simula pa ng July 15 (until September 15) allowed mag-suit without a necktie. So hindi rin ako pwedeng mag-barong siguro. :frowning:

honey

10-06-2005, 11:19 AM

grabe ang mga litanya nyo dito ang haba pero salamat sa lahat ng nagreply:D

stanfordmed

10-06-2005, 12:28 PM

I’m waiting for the others to post the little or big things that they have done to make our country proud of them. Asan na kaya? :confused:

I don’t think I’ve done anything directly to make the Philippines proud of me, but
I’m setting a good reputation as a Filipino by:

Being a responsible citizen/resident to my host country/countries
Educating/supporting myself so as not to be a burden to anyone or the society
Abiding laws and regulations
Respecting individuals culture
Paying my income taxes (more than 30% ang kaltas sa sweldo tapos meron pang dagdag at the end of the tax year) at marami pang ibat ibang taxes.
Attending / Contributing to charities (Phil. and U.S.)
Voting (voted against Dubya Bush http://community.the-underdogs.org/smiley/angry/grr.gif http://community.the-underdogs.org/smiley/angry/grindteeth.gif)
Helping people in my field / line of work
Encouraging and sometimes policing people I know to respect the rules and to conduct themselves accordingly, especially in public places i.e., no littering, following rules, being polite, considerate, etc.
Not eating shark fin or anything from endangered species. :stuck_out_tongue: Personal experience ko lang ito:

Honestly, it’s a bit discouraging to visit the Philippines knowing that relatives expect pasalubong and to foot all the bills in dining, entertainment, and all outing activities, kahit na may good paying job din sila. . I’m sure they would’ve taken offense and held a grudge if I have requested them to share expenses. It’s one of those Filipino mentality (not all) – they’ll take it personally and take it the wrong way. Nakapunta ka lang sa ibang bansa eh akala na nila namimitas ka ng pera sa puno. :frowning:

I didn’t have a good experience when I visited the Philippines due to high cost of expense. I was only a college student, working part time trying to put myself to school when I first visited the Philippines (1990). It was a school break and all I wanted to do was to explore and see the Philippines because I was young when I immigrated out of the country, so never had the chance to travel and see the Philippines. ‘Didn’t see much on that visit because I ended spending way too much out of my budget just being with relatives.

jas_me4u

10-08-2005, 10:20 PM

kahit na anong gawin natin hindi natin matatalikuran ang bansang pilipinas dahil sarili nating bayan i2 bagkus pa pag2lungan natin lahat kung pano natin mabibigyan ng progreso ang bansa natin kahit mabagal basta may unity ang bawat isa kapit kamay k c pinoy tayo ipakita natin sa mundo :stuck_out_tongue:

Chibi

10-08-2005, 11:24 PM

Wala sigurong magsusulat dito na ikinahihiya niyang maging Pilipino, dahil siguradong uulanin ka ng attack messages.

It is so easy to claim that one is proud to be a Filipino - after all, mataas ang pride chicken ng Pinoy - so this question does not hold much meaning to me. Self-congratulatory feel-good answers lang ang makukuha mo diyan.

The more relevant and productive question would be: WHAT HAVE I DONE TO MAKE THE PHILIPPINES PROUD OF ME? Yan ang sagutin ninyo. Kung talagang proud kayo to be a Filipino and you want to make a contribution to the betterment of our country, ipakita niyo hindi lang sa salita kundi sa gawa!
OFW tayo… one point na yun para masabi ko na nakatulong din ako sa bansa hindi lang ako lahat ng OFW na nagdadala ng dollars sa 'Pinas.Skilled/ Unskilled workers man .

docomo

10-10-2005, 09:07 AM

OFW tayo… one point na yun para masabi ko na nakatulong din ako sa bansa hindi lang ako lahat ng OFW na nagdadala ng dollars sa 'Pinas.Skilled/ Unskilled workers man .

… hindi lang yan one point chibi …one big factor yan kaya umunlad ang pilipinas and up to now nagpapaunlad pa rin sa pilipinas at hanggang sa kahulihulihan magpapaunlad pa rin sa pilipinas:)

honey

10-10-2005, 02:25 PM

:smiley: tawa na lang ako hindi ko pa nakitang umunlad e! hindi kaya binubulsa nang kung sino:eek:

Chibi

10-16-2005, 07:49 PM

:smiley: tawa na lang ako hindi ko pa nakitang umunlad e! hindi kaya binubulsa nang kung sino:eek:
In my opinion masasabi ko na kahit paano umunlad kahit konti ang Pilipinas WHY???we belong to developing countries nasa middle tayo.
UNDER DEVELOPED COUNTRIES
DEVELOPING COUNTRIES
DEVELOPED COUNTRIES
napulot ko lang sa history subject.hihihihihi!

mica

10-16-2005, 09:44 PM

kahit na mahirap ang buhay natin sa pinas,pag nanonood nga ako ng tfc naiiyak ako kasi alam ko na masaya sa atin kahit maraming krisis:)

gabby

10-17-2005, 01:14 AM

sa nangyayaring suliranin sa bansa natin proud pa ba kayo maging filipino?:stuck_out_tongue:

Of course I am proud. Why? Do we have a choice?

gabby

10-17-2005, 01:19 AM

… hindi lang yan one point chibi …one big factor yan kaya umunlad ang pilipinas and up to now nagpapaunlad pa rin sa pilipinas at hanggang sa kahulihulihan magpapaunlad pa rin sa pilipinas:)

Heh he he for those who are spouses of Japanese nationals we are not considered OFW. So we have no claim of economic heroism. So don’t be so please about ourselves. We are not heroes but simply us sorry!!! :mad: :confused: :rant: :grrr:

docomo

10-17-2005, 09:05 AM

Heh he he for those who are spouses of Japanese nationals we are not considered OFW. So we have no claim of economic heroism. So don’t be so please about ourselves. We are not heroes but simply us sorry!!! :mad: :confused: :rant: :grrr:

I don’t need to explain to anyone nor soliciting reaction to what I post. That’s my opinion.
What u read is what u read :cool:

Hungry eyes

10-17-2005, 09:17 AM

Basta ako im proud to be what iam.hindi na siguro dapat isa isahin kung ano mga nagawa para inang bansa.basta kabisado pa ang philippines antem.Bayang magiliw.at Panatang makabayan;) pwede na siguro yon…

myukasky

10-17-2005, 11:45 AM

Proud din ako sa pagiging filipino ko:D Kaya lang sa nangyayari sa ating Inang Bayan akoy nalulungkot:( Lagi ko tanong hanggang kailan kaya ang Filipinas sa ganyang kalagayan?

Teddy

10-17-2005, 11:46 AM

Ang pinaka malaking obstacle nga lang ay yung pagiging utak talangka (crab mentality) nung mga iba nating kababayan.

Malimit kong naririnig itong “crab mentality” ng Pilipino people here nad there, pero hindi ko pa alam kung anong mentality ito. Can someone explain this to me? Thanks:)

myukasky

10-17-2005, 11:48 AM

Basta ako im proud to be what iam.hindi na siguro dapat isa isahin kung ano mga nagawa para inang bansa.basta kabisado pa ang philippines antem.Bayang magiliw.at Panatang makabayan;) pwede na siguro yon…

Hungry eyes:D Philippines anthem, Bayang Magiliw or Lupang Hinirang? Ano po ba talaga diyan ate?:slight_smile:

myukasky

10-17-2005, 11:56 AM

Malimit kong naririnig itong “crab mentality” ng Pilipino people here nad there, pero hindi ko pa alam kung anong mentality ito. Can someone explain this to me? Thanks:)

Sa aking pakakaalam lang ah, “crab mentality” ayaw mong magpapalamang or gusto mo same level lang kayo, gagawa at gagawa ka ng paraan para di umunlad ang kapwa mo. Sa abroad maraming ganyan.

Teddy

10-17-2005, 12:54 PM

Sa aking pakakaalam lang ah, “crab mentality” ayaw mong magpapalamang or gusto mo same level lang kayo, gagawa at gagawa ka ng paraan para di umunlad ang kapwa mo. Sa abroad maraming ganyan.

Hi, myukasky! Salamat sa paliwanag mo:)

Hungry eyes

10-17-2005, 02:13 PM

myukasky.napansin mo rin.pinaikot ko lang:D

Chibi

10-17-2005, 08:46 PM

Heh he he for those who are spouses of Japanese nationals we are not considered OFW. So we have no claim of economic heroism. So don’t be so please about ourselves. We are not heroes but simply us sorry!!! :mad: :confused: :rant: :grrr:
huh!!!sino ba dyan ang me asawa na!!!hehehehhehe!jow k!
i mean dati rin kase kong OFW…lulusot talaga eh!!!:grinny:

Stacie Fil

10-17-2005, 11:25 PM

Hungry eyes:D Philippines anthem, Bayang Magiliw or Lupang Hinirang? Ano po ba talaga diyan ate?:slight_smile:

Siguro yung “pambansang awit”, ha,ha,ha, joke lang po.

Smile :slight_smile:

ugnayan

10-18-2005, 12:56 AM

Mga kaibigan kong Hapon at Pilipino ay kasama kong nagbabasa ngayon ng aklat, Purpose-Driven Life, What on earth am I here for? Nakakatuwang isipin na may mga tao na mahirap tanggapin kung bakit Pilipino sila o ipinagkakait o ipagkakaila o ikinakahiya ang lahi nila. Parang tinanong na rin natin sa ating Manlilikha kung bakit Pilipino akong ipinanganak?

I agree with the lines in the book: God also planned where you’d be born and where you’d live for His purpose. Your race and nationality are no accident…God knew that those two individuals (parents) possessed exactly the right genetic makeup to create the custom “you” He had in mind.

Cheer up as you read my friend’s email to me just few minutes ago & like her, I’m VERY HAPPY that God created me a Filipino!

PROUD TO BE PINOY…

Alam niyo na nanalo ang Pilipinas sa Ms. International! But what touched me most was not her title but the way she answered a sarcastic and a seemingly negative question about Filipinos. Sana lahat ng mga kababayan natin ganito ang attitude.

“Mabuhay! Representing the democratic and freedom loving people of the Pearl of the Orient, I am precious LARA QUIGAMAN, from the beautiful country of THE PHILIPPINES” !

The question:

Q: “what do you say to the people of the world who have typecasted Filipinos as nannies?”

A: “I take no offense on being typecasted as a nanny. But I do take offense that the educated people of the world have somehow denigraded the true sense and meaning of what a nanny is. Let me tell you what she is. She is someone who gives more than she takes. She is someone you trust to look after the very people most precious to you - your child, the elderly, yourself. She is the one who has made a living out of caring and loving other people. So to those who have typecasted us as nannies, thank you. It is a testament to the loving and caring culture of the Filipino people; And for that, I am forever proud and grateful of my roots and culture.”

gabby

10-18-2005, 01:30 AM

Mga kaibigan kong Hapon at Pilipino ay kasama kong nagbabasa ngayon ng aklat, Purpose-Driven Life, What on earth am I here for? Nakakatuwang isipin na may mga tao na mahirap tanggapin kung bakit Pilipino sila o ipinagkakait o ipagkakaila o ikinakahiya ang lahi nila. Parang tinanong na rin natin sa ating Manlilikha kung bakit Pilipino akong ipinanganak?

I agree with the lines in the book: God also planned where you’d be born and where you’d live for His purpose. Your race and nationality are no accident…God knew that those two individuals (parents) possessed exactly the right genetic makeup to create the custom “you” He had in mind.

Cheer up as you read my friend’s email to me just few minutes ago & like her, I’m VERY HAPPY that God created me a Filipino!

PROUD TO BE PINOY…

Alam niyo na nanalo ang Pilipinas sa Ms. International! But what touched me most was not her title but the way she answered a sarcastic and a seemingly negative question about Filipinos. Sana lahat ng mga kababayan natin ganito ang attitude.

“Mabuhay! Representing the democratic and freedom loving people of the Pearl of the Orient, I am precious LARA QUIGAMAN, from the beautiful country of THE PHILIPPINES” !

The question:

Q: “what do you say to the people of the world who have typecasted Filipinos as nannies?”

A: “I take no offense on being typecasted as a nanny. But I do take offense that the educated people of the world have somehow denigraded the true sense and meaning of what a nanny is. Let me tell you what she is. She is someone who gives more than she takes. She is someone you trust to look after the very people most precious to you - your child, the elderly, yourself. She is the one who has made a living out of caring and loving other people. So to those who have typecasted us as nannies, thank you. It is a testament to the loving and caring culture of the Filipino people; And for that, I am forever proud and grateful of my roots and culture.”

Just like what I said I am proud of myself. My skin and my nationality. But I am positive I am not proud of the people in the Philippines. I love my country but I am not proud of anyone in the Philippines. I am not proud of those people who have failed to lead. I am not proud of all the senators,congressmen ,the President herself but I am supporting her against the hypocrites, the PDI, the Bishops and other christian religious leaders, I am not proud of our airport, I am not proud of PAL but very proud of Cebu Pacific, I am ashame of the Pakikisama system, I am not proud of UP,I am not proud of the PNB in Tokyo,even in the Philippines( PNB people are very lousy and heighly unprofessional) but I like and very proud of Metrobank in Suidobashi, their service is world class, I am not proud of the civil service in the Philippines, I am not proud of the Philippines embassy and lastly I am not proud of the National language which is Tagalog. I am not proud of tagalog and I am not ashame of it either. I have no issues against the nannies,DOH or even the Japayukis.

And that ladies and gentlemen are my feelings about this very boring issue of Filipino Pride. Someone here had mentioned that we should ask something else instead of pride. She or he is right. I have contributed to my country by trying to change my mind set and have made progress by showing to the Japanese and the expats in Japan that Filipinos are hard working and intelligent. That there are Filipinos who mean business.

ugnayan

10-18-2005, 02:40 AM

OK ka lang ba, Gabby? (Are you OK? I’m not sure if you can understand my Tagalog.) I hope you’re not bitter though because people in my country failed you. How can we make things better?

Since I learned about Timog Forum in the Philippine Inquirer, your response could be read by a lot of people and you can impact or influence them. I respect your feelings and experiences. But can we keep that hope Philippines and the Filipino people scattered around the world can have the chance to rise again? Our prayers and positive action can indeed make a difference–acting locally, thinking globally!

gabby

10-18-2005, 07:26 AM

OK ka lang ba, Gabby? (Are you OK? I’m not sure if you can understand my Tagalog.) I hope you’re not bitter though because people in my country failed you. How can we make things better?

Since I learned about Timog Forum in the Philippine Inquirer, your response could be read by a lot of people and you can impact or influence them. I respect your feelings and experiences. But can we keep that hope Philippines and the Filipino people scattered around the world can have the chance to rise again? Our prayers and positive action can indeed make a difference–acting locally, thinking globally!

Of course I am feeling bitter ain’t I? I thought you read my post? Do I feel glorious about the Philippines? Of course not. You are so messy there. You are not doing anything good in the Philippines but shame. I found TF through the PDI but I don’t feel I owed it to them. Internet is a public domain no one owns it. You should have appreciated my sentiment because they are the real issue.

I have hope my dear. It’s very obvious. I couldn’t fool myself by pretending that everything in the PI is okay. What I mentioned in my post are the real issues that greedy politicians including the President, Cory Aquino and church authorities have ignored. If I hadn’t had a hope I wouldn’t have bothered to post what I think is wrong about the Philippines would I?

You know what you should really grow up so you can face head on what makes the Philippines the under-achiever in Asia. Prayers and positive action HUH!. What does it mean?

tower23ph

10-20-2005, 09:02 PM

To one of our TF member,we all know that our country is expiriencing political problems as of now…thats the reality. But can I ask you something, if those politicians or those people in your mind who did nothing to my country turns back to their positions. Who do you think will be the most illegible one?

goldhorse

10-20-2005, 09:39 PM

Hi, myukasky! Salamat sa paliwanag mo:)

The reason why it’s called crab mentality is that if you put a number of crabs inside ta basket, you won’t need a cover since a crab will grab the leg of another crab which is trying to climb out of the basket, so all the crabs will end up being unable to escape.

In Japanese you have a saying, deru kugi wa utareru.

Anyway back to the regular programming. Am I proud to be a Filipino?

Let me put it this way, I have worked with Japanese, Italians, Americans, and people from other countries. When I first met any of these people they had only the impression that I come from a developing country (of as some may argue underdeveloped country). But when they hear what I have done in the past and when they see how I work, their attitude towards me change. They say, “I didn’t know Filipinos could work as well”, (In my opinion this is a half praise, half insult) “maybe we’ll hire more Filipinos”. I am still not sure if I am happy for myself, or for my country when I hear this, but what I can say is that I perform my duties instead of trying to see how the next person is doing, and if most of us will do the same, maybe someday, we will not even need to ask if we are proud to be a Filipino.

ugnayan

10-29-2005, 02:28 AM

Why is the Filipino Special?

Filipinos are Brown. Their color is in the center of human racial strains.

This point is not an attempt at racism, but just for many Filipinos to realize that our color should not be a source of or reason for inferiority complex. While we pine for a fair complexion, the white people are religiously tanning themselves, whenever they could, under the sun or some artificial light, just to approximate the Filipino complexion.

Filipinos are a touching people. We have lots of love and are not afraid to show it. We almost inevitably create human chains with our perennial akbay (putting an arm around another shoulder), hawak (hold),yakap (embrace), himas (caressing stroke), kalabit (touch with the tip of the finger), kalong (sitting on someone else’s lap), etc.

We are always reaching out, always seeking interconnection. Filipinos are linguists. Put a Filipino in any city, any town around the world. Give him a few months or even weeks and he will speak the local language there.Filipinos are adept at learning and speaking languages. In fact, it is not uncommon for Filipinos to speak at least three: his dialect, Filipino, and English. Of course, a lot speak an added language, be it Chinese, Spanish or, if he works abroad, the language of his host country.

In addition, Tagalog is not ‘sexist.’ While many “conscious” and “enlightened” people of today are just by now striving to be “politically correct” with their language and, in the process, bend to absurd depths in coining “gender sensitive” words, Tagalog has, since time immemorial, evolved gender-neutral words like asawa (husband or wife), anak (son or daughter), magulang (father or mother), kapatid (brother or sister), biyenan ( father-in-law or mother-in-law), manugang (son or daughter-in-law), bayani (hero or heroine), etc. Our languages and dialects are advanced and, indeed, sophisticated! It is no small wonder that Jose Rizal, the quintessential Filipino, spoke some twenty-two languages!

Filipinos are groupists. We love human inter-action and company. We always surround ourselves with people and we hover over them, too. According to Dr. Patricia Licuanan, a psychologist from Ateneo and Miriam College, an average Filipino would have and know at least 300 relatives.

At work, we live bayanihan (mutual help); at play, we want a kalaro (playmate) more than laruan (toy). At socials, our invitations are open and it is more common even for guests to invite and bring in other guests. In transit, we do not want to be separated from our group. So what do we do when there is no more space in a vehicle?

Kalung-kalong! (Sit on one another). No one would ever suggest splitting a group and waiting for another vehicle with more space! Filipinos are weavers. One look at our baskets, mats, clothes, and other crafts will reveal the skill of the Filipino weaver and his inclination to weaving. This art is a metaphor of the Filipino trait. We are social weavers. ! We weave theirs into ours that we all become parts of one another. We place a lot of premium on pakikisama (getting along) and pakikipagkapwa (relating). Two of the worst labels, walang pakikipagkapwa (inability to relate), will be avoided by the Filipino at almost any cost.

We love to blend and harmonize with people, we like to include them in our “tribe,” in our “family”-and we like to be included in other people’s families, too.

Therefore we call our friend’s mother nanay or mommy; we call a friend’s sister ate (eldest sister), and so on. We even call strangers tia (aunt) or tio (uncle), tatang (grandfather), etc.

So extensive is our social openness and interrelations that we have specific title for extended relations like hipag (sister-in-law’s spouse), balae (child-in-law’s parents), inaanak (godchild), ninong/ninang (godparents) kinakapatid (godparent’s child), etc.

In addition, we have the profound ‘ka’ institution, loosely translated as “equal to the same kind” as in kasama (of the same company), kaisa (of the same cause), kapanalig (of the same belief), etc. In our social fiber, we treat other people as co-equals.

Filipinos, because of their social “weaving” traditions, make for excellent team workers.

Filipinos are adventurers. We have a tradition of separation. Our myths and legends speak of heroes and heroines who almost always get separated from their families and loved ones and are taken by circumstances to far-away lands where they find wealth or power.

Our Spanish colonial history is filled with separations caused by the reduccion (hamleting), and the forced migration to build towns, churches, fortresses or galleons. American occupation enlarged the space of Filipino wandering, including America, and there are documented evidences of Filipino presence in America as far back as 1587.

Now, Filipinos compose the world’s largest population of overseas workers, populating and sometimes “threshing” major capitals, minor towns and even remote villages around the world. Filipino adventurism has made us today’s citizens of the world, bringing the bagoong (salty shrimp paste), pansit (sautéed noodles), siopao (meat-filled dough), kare-kare (peanut-flavored dish), dinuguan (innards cooked in pork blood), balut (unhatched duck egg), and adobo (meat vinaigrette), including the tabo (ladle) and tsinelas (slippers) all over the world.

Filipinos are excellent at adjustments and improvisation, managing to recreate their home, or to feel at home anywhere.

Filipinos have Pakiramdam (deep feeling/discernment) . We know how to feel what others feel, sometimes even anticipate what they will feel. Being manhid (dense) is one of the worst labels anyone could get and will therefore, avoid at all cost. We know when a guest is hungry though the insistence on being full is assured.

We can tell if people are lovers even if they are miles apart. We know if a person is offended though he may purposely smile. We know because we feel. In our pakikipagkapwa(relat ing), we get not only to wear another man’s shoe but also his heart.

We have a superbly developed and honored gift of discernment, making us excellent leaders, counselors, and go-betweens. Filipinos are very spiritual. We are transcendent. We transcend the physical world, see the unseen and hear the unheard. We have a deep sense of kaba (premonition) and kutob (hunch). A Filipino wife will instinctively feel her husband or child is going astray, whether or not telltale signs present themselves.

Filipino spirituality makes him invoke divine presence or intervention at nearly every bend of his journey. Rightly or wrongly, Filipinos are almost always acknowledging, invoking or driving away spirits into and from their lives. Seemingly trivial or even incoherent events can take on spiritual significance and will be given such space or consideration.

The Filipino has a sophisticated, developed pakiramdam. The Filipino, though becoming more and more modern (hence, materialistic) is still very spiritual in essence. This inherent and deep spirituality makes the Filipino, once correctly Christianized, a major exponent of the faith.

Filipinos are timeless. Despite the nearly half-a-millennium encroachment of the western clock into our lives, Filipinos-unless on very formal or official functions-still measure time not with hours and minutes but with feeling. This style is ingrained deep in our psyche. Our time is diffused, not framed. Our appointments are defined by umaga (morning), tanghali (noon), hapon (afternoon), or gabi (evening).

Our most exact time reference is probably katanghaliang-tapat (high noon), which still allows many minutes of leeway. That is how Filipino trysts and occasions are timed: there is really no definite time.

A Filipino event has no clear-cut beginning or ending. We have a fiesta , but there is bisperas (eve), a day after the fiesta is still considered a good time to visit. The Filipino Christmas is not confined to December 25th; it somehow begins months before December and extends up to the first days of January.

Filipinos say good-bye to guests first at the head of the stairs, then down to the descamo (landing), to the entresuelo (mezzanine), to the pintuan (doorway), to the tarangkahan (gate), and if the departing persons are to take public transportation, up to the bus stop or bus station.

In a way, other people’s tardiness and extended stays can really be annoying, but this peculiarity is the same charm of Filipinos, who being governed by timelessness, can show how to find more time to be nice, kind, and accommodating than his prompt and exact brothers elsewhere.

Filipinos are Spaceless. As in the concept of time, the Filipino concept of space is not numerical. We will not usually express expanse of space with miles or kilometers but with feelings in how we say malayo (far) or malapit (near).

Alongside with numberlessness, Filipino space is also boundless. Indigenous culture did not divide land nto private lots but kept it open for all to partake of its abundance.

The Filipino has avidly remained “spaceless” in many ways. The interior of the bahay-kubo (hut) can easily become receiving room, sleeping room, kitchen, dining room, chapel, wake parlor, etc. Depending on the time of the day or the needs of the moment. The same is true with the bahay na bato (stone house). Space just flows into the next space that the divisions between the sala, caida, comedor, or vilada may only be faintly suggested by overhead arches of filigree. In much the same way, Filipino concept of space can be so diffused that one 's party may creep into and actually expropriate the street! A family business like a sari-sari store or talyer may extend to the sidewalk and street. Provincial folks dry palayan (rice grain) on the highways! Religious groups of various persuasions habitually and matter-of-factly commandeer the streets for processions and parades.

It is not uncommon to close a street to accommodate private functions, Filipinos eat, sleep, chat, socialize, quarrel, even urinate, nearly everywhere or just anywhere!

“Spacelessness,” in the face of modern, especially urban life, can be unlawful and may really be counter-productive. On the other hand, Filipino spacelessness, when viewed from his context, is just another manifestation of his spiritually and communal values. Adapted well to today’s context, which may mean unstoppable urbanization, Filipino spacelessness may even be the answer and counter balance to humanity’s greed, selfishness and isolation.

So what makes the Filipino special? We are brown, spiritual, timeless, spaceless, linguists, groupists, weavers, adventurers. Seldom do all these profound qualities find personification in a people. Filipinos should allow - and should be allowed to contribute their special traits to the world-wide community of men - but first, we should know and like ourselves.

(Written by Ed Lapiz)

honey

10-29-2005, 01:11 PM

o!grabe debate dito a!:stuck_out_tongue:

jramar

11-09-2005, 09:47 PM

yan ang kakantahin ko sa united nation pag bumisita kami nila pareng bush at koizumi. isasama ko si pareng bamboo para kaduet.

depp

11-10-2005, 11:29 AM

ngayon ko lang nabasa ito,grabe pala ang debate dito.basta ako,kung tatanungin,proud na proud akong maging maging pilipino.kasi pilipino ang mga magulang ko at ipinanganak ako sa pilipinas.at di ko ikinahihiya ang bansa ko.at higit sa lahat,sobrang saya ko pag nasa pilipinas ako.

myukasky

11-10-2005, 12:06 PM

yan ang kakantahin ko sa united nation pag bumisita kami nila pareng bush at koizumi. isasama ko si pareng bamboo para kaduet.

Sama ko jramar sa pagkanta, pero turuan mo muna ako di ko pa naririnig yang kantang yan eh:D

ringo

11-10-2005, 02:37 PM

I belong there! Isa ako sa nadidismaya sa mga nangyayari sa bansa natin…sabi nga, not unless dumistansya ka hindi mo makikita ang tunay na kaganapan sa kabuuan. Wala naman akong sinisisi at mahirap din ang magkumpara. Like you will just say look at Japan it is so progressive because the Japanese are like this or that…But Filipinos are good guys! marami na rin ako narinig na pumuri sa ating pagiging Filipino.

Now tayo na andito sa ibang bansa, nagtratrabaho man o nag-aaral o anuman ang ginagawa ay di dapat ikahiya ang pagiging pinoy…o kaya ay itago ito. Wala na tayo magagawa Filipino tayo e. Pero OK ako na naging Pinoy ako wala akong pinagsisihan don. Pero siyempre nakakalungkot din na ganun nga ang nagiging image natin sa kanila.

Kaya sana ang dapat nating gawin ay isipin natin ang Pilipinas sa kabuuan. Yon bang tinatawag na holistic assessment. Ano ba ang makakabuti sa bansa natin? Paano ako makatutulong at paano ko mapapabuti ang image ng Pilipinas sa mga banyaga na mga kaharap ko. Naalala ko tuloy yong sinabi sa akin don sa Japan Embassy sa Pinas during our orientation…isipi n mo na hindi ka nagpunta sa Japan as _________ bagkus andun ka as a Filipino.

Sa kaso ko everytime that I have a chance para akong tourism agent na palagi ko ibinibida ang magagandang lugar sa Pinas na puwede nilang puntahan. In that way makakatulong tayo na mag boost ang tourism industry ng bansa natin.

Sa ngayon nag-aaral ako dito at nag-iipon din and through the money I can save from my scholarship that I can send to Pinas…makkatulong din yon kahit papano.

So mga nag post dito ay lubos akong nagpapasalamat at di pa rin pala ako nag-iisa sa pagnanais ng mapabuti ang kalagayan ng bansa natin. At bakit hindi? ahh masarap pa ring ang mabuhay at manahan kapiling ang mga mahal mo sa buhay sa bansa natin.

—ringo

kisha57

11-10-2005, 03:55 PM

I must, because, I am.I was born there.I cannot deny it in anyway.For how could I?
Di nyo ba napapansin I seldom hear or see good news about us/our country exempt calamities and bad news,being aired here in Japan?Kaya It’s hard to be a Filipino here.They would like gaigin, american/ european but not being friend of Filipinos.:cool: I just wonder why,bakit baliktad yata,ang matatandang hapon pa ang galit sa mga filipinos while in fact tayo dapat ang galit sa kanila!:cool:
Kaya kong tumira dito sa japan for life.Because I dont look like Filipino.I live like them.Type ko na rito.Im proud or being me.But in the end:rolleyes: …I am a Filipino…sa puso ,sa diwa at sa gawa…:slight_smile:

Chibi

11-10-2005, 04:00 PM

I belong there! Isa ako sa nadidismaya sa mga nangyayari sa bansa natin…sabi nga, not unless dumistansya ka hindi mo makikita ang tunay na kaganapan sa kabuuan. Wala naman akong sinisisi at mahirap din ang magkumpara. Like you will just say look at Japan it is so progressive because the Japanese are like this or that…But Filipinos are good guys! marami na rin ako narinig na pumuri sa ating pagiging Filipino.

Now tayo na andito sa ibang bansa, nagtratrabaho man o nag-aaral o anuman ang ginagawa ay di dapat ikahiya ang pagiging pinoy…o kaya ay itago ito. Wala na tayo magagawa Filipino tayo e. Pero OK ako na naging Pinoy ako wala akong pinagsisihan don. Pero siyempre nakakalungkot din na ganun nga ang nagiging image natin sa kanila.

Kaya sana ang dapat nating gawin ay isipin natin ang Pilipinas sa kabuuan. Yon bang tinatawag na holistic assessment. Ano ba ang makakabuti sa bansa natin? Paano ako makatutulong at paano ko mapapabuti ang image ng Pilipinas sa mga banyaga na mga kaharap ko. Naalala ko tuloy yong sinabi sa akin don sa Japan Embassy sa Pinas during our orientation…isipi n mo na hindi ka nagpunta sa Japan as _________ bagkus andun ka as a Filipino.

Sa kaso ko everytime that I have a chance para akong tourism agent na palagi ko ibinibida ang magagandang lugar sa Pinas na puwede nilang puntahan. In that way makakatulong tayo na mag boost ang tourism industry ng bansa natin.

Sa ngayon nag-aaral ako dito at nag-iipon din and through the money I can save from my scholarship that I can send to Pinas…makkatulong din yon kahit papano.

So mga nag post dito ay lubos akong nagpapasalamat at di pa rin pala ako nag-iisa sa pagnanais ng mapabuti ang kalagayan ng bansa natin. At bakit hindi? ahh masarap pa ring ang mabuhay at manahan kapiling ang mga mahal mo sa buhay sa bansa natin.

—ringoWow!!yan ang Pinoy!!bow ako sa iyo!!!siguro the best na gawin naten i-up na lang naten image ng’Pinoy, i mean pag nasa ibang bansa tayo just follow the rules and regulation,mag adjust tayo sa culture nila kahit ka plastikan!!hahhahaha !:smiley: jowk!

mquial

11-10-2005, 05:19 PM

Im proud to be a Filipino.

Meron lang talagang iba na kahit nakarating na sa ibang bansa ay dala dala pa rin ang mga pangit na kaugalian natin.

jramar

11-10-2005, 07:06 PM

eto para sa inyong lahat magkatahan tayo!!!
http://s27.yousendit.com/d.aspx?id=0R2J09WJBC M0XGUSY4DVN1YD

jramar

11-10-2005, 07:09 PM

http://s27.yousendit.com/d.aspx?id=0R2J09J0WJ BCM0XGUSY4DVN1YD

eto mali ung pasok kanina enjoy the music!

myukasky

11-10-2005, 08:24 PM

http://s27.yousendit.com/d.aspx?id=0R2J09J0WJ BCM0XGUSY4DVN1YD

eto mali ung pasok kanina enjoy the music!

Thanks jramar:D Bukas practice ko kantahin di na kasi puwede ngayon at gabi na baka magalit kapitbahay ko:rolleyes: :rolleyes: Jokes:)

myukasky

11-10-2005, 08:27 PM

yan ang kakantahin ko sa united nation pag bumisita kami nila pareng bush at koizumi. isasama ko si pareng bamboo para kaduet.

jramar sama natin si mareng gloria para may muse tayo:D

jramar

11-10-2005, 08:49 PM

OK sinabi mo eh.

tfcfan

11-10-2005, 10:32 PM

:yesyes: I’m proud to be a filipino!
kase di naman mawawala ang pagka-filipino natin kahit santambak na problema ang dinaranas natin sa ngayon.besides there’s no place like home!!!babalik ka rin!!!:stuck_out_tongue:

gabby

11-10-2005, 11:50 PM

Why is the Filipino Special?

Filipinos are Brown. Their color is in the center of human racial strains.

This point is not an attempt at racism, but just for many Filipinos to realize that our color should not be a source of or reason for inferiority complex. While we pine for a fair complexion, the white people are religiously tanning themselves, whenever they could, under the sun or some artificial light, just to approximate the Filipino complexion.

Filipinos are a touching people. We have lots of love and are not afraid to show it. We almost inevitably create human chains with our perennial akbay (putting an arm around another shoulder), hawak (hold),yakap (embrace), himas (caressing stroke), kalabit (touch with the tip of the finger), kalong (sitting on someone else’s lap), etc.

We are always reaching out, always seeking interconnection. Filipinos are linguists. Put a Filipino in any city, any town around the world. Give him a few months or even weeks and he will speak the local language there.Filipinos are adept at learning and speaking languages. In fact, it is not uncommon for Filipinos to speak at least three: his dialect, Filipino, and English. Of course, a lot speak an added language, be it Chinese, Spanish or, if he works abroad, the language of his host country.

In addition, Tagalog is not ‘sexist.’ While many “conscious” and “enlightened” people of today are just by now striving to be “politically correct” with their language and, in the process, bend to absurd depths in coining “gender sensitive” words, Tagalog has, since time immemorial, evolved gender-neutral words like asawa (husband or wife), anak (son or daughter), magulang (father or mother), kapatid (brother or sister), biyenan ( father-in-law or mother-in-law), manugang (son or daughter-in-law), bayani (hero or heroine), etc. Our languages and dialects are advanced and, indeed, sophisticated! It is no small wonder that Jose Rizal, the quintessential Filipino, spoke some twenty-two languages!

Filipinos are groupists. We love human inter-action and company. We always surround ourselves with people and we hover over them, too. According to Dr. Patricia Licuanan, a psychologist from Ateneo and Miriam College, an average Filipino would have and know at least 300 relatives.

At work, we live bayanihan (mutual help); at play, we want a kalaro (playmate) more than laruan (toy). At socials, our invitations are open and it is more common even for guests to invite and bring in other guests. In transit, we do not want to be separated from our group. So what do we do when there is no more space in a vehicle?

Kalung-kalong! (Sit on one another). No one would ever suggest splitting a group and waiting for another vehicle with more space! Filipinos are weavers. One look at our baskets, mats, clothes, and other crafts will reveal the skill of the Filipino weaver and his inclination to weaving. This art is a metaphor of the Filipino trait. We are social weavers. ! We weave theirs into ours that we all become parts of one another. We place a lot of premium on pakikisama (getting along) and pakikipagkapwa (relating). Two of the worst labels, walang pakikipagkapwa (inability to relate), will be avoided by the Filipino at almost any cost.

We love to blend and harmonize with people, we like to include them in our “tribe,” in our “family”-and we like to be included in other people’s families, too.

Therefore we call our friend’s mother nanay or mommy; we call a friend’s sister ate (eldest sister), and so on. We even call strangers tia (aunt) or tio (uncle), tatang (grandfather), etc.

So extensive is our social openness and interrelations that we have specific title for extended relations like hipag (sister-in-law’s spouse), balae (child-in-law’s parents), inaanak (godchild), ninong/ninang (godparents) kinakapatid (godparent’s child), etc.

In addition, we have the profound ‘ka’ institution, loosely translated as “equal to the same kind” as in kasama (of the same company), kaisa (of the same cause), kapanalig (of the same belief), etc. In our social fiber, we treat other people as co-equals.

Filipinos, because of their social “weaving” traditions, make for excellent team workers.

Filipinos are adventurers. We have a tradition of separation. Our myths and legends speak of heroes and heroines who almost always get separated from their families and loved ones and are taken by circumstances to far-away lands where they find wealth or power.

Our Spanish colonial history is filled with separations caused by the reduccion (hamleting), and the forced migration to build towns, churches, fortresses or galleons. American occupation enlarged the space of Filipino wandering, including America, and there are documented evidences of Filipino presence in America as far back as 1587.

Now, Filipinos compose the world’s largest population of overseas workers, populating and sometimes “threshing” major capitals, minor towns and even remote villages around the world. Filipino adventurism has made us today’s citizens of the world, bringing the bagoong (salty shrimp paste), pansit (sautéed noodles), siopao (meat-filled dough), kare-kare (peanut-flavored dish), dinuguan (innards cooked in pork blood), balut (unhatched duck egg), and adobo (meat vinaigrette), including the tabo (ladle) and tsinelas (slippers) all over the world.

Filipinos are excellent at adjustments and improvisation, managing to recreate their home, or to feel at home anywhere.

Filipinos have Pakiramdam (deep feeling/discernment) . We know how to feel what others feel, sometimes even anticipate what they will feel. Being manhid (dense) is one of the worst labels anyone could get and will therefore, avoid at all cost. We know when a guest is hungry though the insistence on being full is assured.

We can tell if people are lovers even if they are miles apart. We know if a person is offended though he may purposely smile. We know because we feel. In our pakikipagkapwa(relat ing), we get not only to wear another man’s shoe but also his heart.

We have a superbly developed and honored gift of discernment, making us excellent leaders, counselors, and go-betweens. Filipinos are very spiritual. We are transcendent. We transcend the physical world, see the unseen and hear the unheard. We have a deep sense of kaba (premonition) and kutob (hunch). A Filipino wife will instinctively feel her husband or child is going astray, whether or not telltale signs present themselves.

Filipino spirituality makes him invoke divine presence or intervention at nearly every bend of his journey. Rightly or wrongly, Filipinos are almost always acknowledging, invoking or driving away spirits into and from their lives. Seemingly trivial or even incoherent events can take on spiritual significance and will be given such space or consideration.

The Filipino has a sophisticated, developed pakiramdam. The Filipino, though becoming more and more modern (hence, materialistic) is still very spiritual in essence. This inherent and deep spirituality makes the Filipino, once correctly Christianized, a major exponent of the faith.

Filipinos are timeless. Despite the nearly half-a-millennium encroachment of the western clock into our lives, Filipinos-unless on very formal or official functions-still measure time not with hours and minutes but with feeling. This style is ingrained deep in our psyche. Our time is diffused, not framed. Our appointments are defined by umaga (morning), tanghali (noon), hapon (afternoon), or gabi (evening).

Our most exact time reference is probably katanghaliang-tapat (high noon), which still allows many minutes of leeway. That is how Filipino trysts and occasions are timed: there is really no definite time.

A Filipino event has no clear-cut beginning or ending. We have a fiesta , but there is bisperas (eve), a day after the fiesta is still considered a good time to visit. The Filipino Christmas is not confined to December 25th; it somehow begins months before December and extends up to the first days of January.

Filipinos say good-bye to guests first at the head of the stairs, then down to the descamo (landing), to the entresuelo (mezzanine), to the pintuan (doorway), to the tarangkahan (gate), and if the departing persons are to take public transportation, up to the bus stop or bus station.

In a way, other people’s tardiness and extended stays can really be annoying, but this peculiarity is the same charm of Filipinos, who being governed by timelessness, can show how to find more time to be nice, kind, and accommodating than his prompt and exact brothers elsewhere.

Filipinos are Spaceless. As in the concept of time, the Filipino concept of space is not numerical. We will not usually express expanse of space with miles or kilometers but with feelings in how we say malayo (far) or malapit (near).

Alongside with numberlessness, Filipino space is also boundless. Indigenous culture did not divide land nto private lots but kept it open for all to partake of its abundance.

The Filipino has avidly remained “spaceless” in many ways. The interior of the bahay-kubo (hut) can easily become receiving room, sleeping room, kitchen, dining room, chapel, wake parlor, etc. Depending on the time of the day or the needs of the moment. The same is true with the bahay na bato (stone house). Space just flows into the next space that the divisions between the sala, caida, comedor, or vilada may only be faintly suggested by overhead arches of filigree. In much the same way, Filipino concept of space can be so diffused that one 's party may creep into and actually expropriate the street! A family business like a sari-sari store or talyer may extend to the sidewalk and street. Provincial folks dry palayan (rice grain) on the highways! Religious groups of various persuasions habitually and matter-of-factly commandeer the streets for processions and parades.

It is not uncommon to close a street to accommodate private functions, Filipinos eat, sleep, chat, socialize, quarrel, even urinate, nearly everywhere or just anywhere!

“Spacelessness,” in the face of modern, especially urban life, can be unlawful and may really be counter-productive. On the other hand, Filipino spacelessness, when viewed from his context, is just another manifestation of his spiritually and communal values. Adapted well to today’s context, which may mean unstoppable urbanization, Filipino spacelessness may even be the answer and counter balance to humanity’s greed, selfishness and isolation.

So what makes the Filipino special? We are brown, spiritual, timeless, spaceless, linguists, groupists, weavers, adventurers. Seldom do all these profound qualities find personification in a people. Filipinos should allow - and should be allowed to contribute their special traits to the world-wide community of men - but first, we should know and like ourselves.

(Written by Ed Lapiz)

I am most certainly proud of the color of my skin. I am most certainly believe that it wont take a Lea Salonga or a Miss International winner to change the fact that Filipinos lack what it takes to be highly organise and great nation.

ugnayan

11-11-2005, 02:48 PM

It’s good to be Pinoy
Juan L. Mercado

“Do a column on idiosyncracies of people,” suggested Fr. Emmanuel Non, the Jesuit priest who, over the last 30 years, picked up kids from crime-bugged streets and gave them an education in a unique Cebu farm school.

“If you focus on Pinoys, you can fill a volume.”

By sheer coincidence, a homesick Filipina in Alberta, Canada, forwarded “100 Best Things About Pinoy”. The compiler’s name unfortunately was not tacked on. That mucks up attribution.

“Things irresistibly Pinoy mark us for life, “ the author points out.

“They’re the indelible stamp of our identity…They celebrate the good in us, the best of our culture and the infinite possibilities we are all capable of.”

It’s not possible to cram all 100 idiosyncracies or traits within a column’s 800 word ceiling. Here are a few of them. Enjoy.

At a loss for words? Try “kuwan, ano”. Then marvel at how Pinoys understand exactly what you want. Speech suffixes define courtesy, filial respect These include : “Opo”, or “Mano Po”, even the abbreviated “po” —- a balm to the spirit in these aggressive ill-tempered times.

“Sayang!” “Naman!” “Kadiri!” “Ano ba!” “pala.” are also expressions that defy translation. But they wring out feelings genuinely Pinoy.

These are linked to titles: Manang, kuya, ate, manong, ditse, ineng, totoy,
Ingkong, Aling etc. There’s no exact English translation. But they connote respect, deference and the value placed on kinship.

Some overseas Filipino workers don’t trust banks. “Pakidala” is their personalized door-to-door remittance and delivery system.

They expect a family update from the courier, as well.

Did “pakidala” habit evolve from the “pasalubong”?. That’s our way of sharing the vicarious thrills and delights of a trip. It also a wonderful excuse to shop without the customary guilt.

The “Balikbayan box” institutionalizes “pakidala.” . This is another Pinoy way of sharing life’s bounty, no matter if it seems like we’re fleeing Pol Pot everytime we head home from anywhere in the globe.

The most wonderful part is that, more often than not, the contents are carted home to be shared.

“Merienda” : Where else is it normal to eat five times a day – except probably Thailand? Or “Sawsawan”. These assorted sauces guarantee freedom of choice, enough room for experimentation and maximum tolerance for diverse tastes. Favorites: toyo’t calamansi, suka at sili, patis.

Pinoys are the guys who put sugar into spaghetti sauce. Remember?

Their tastes are a dietitian’s nightmare: too sweet, too salty, too fatty, as in itlog na maalat, crab fat (aligue), bokayo, kutchinta, sapin-sapin, halo-halo, palitaw, pulburon, longganisa, tuyo, ensaymada, macapuno.

Despite its shrinking size, “pan de sal” is still a good buy. Goes well with any filling, best when hot. Of course, there’s “dinuguan” or blood stew.

It’s in the same league with the darkly mysterious “bagoong”: fish or shrimp paste typifies the underlying theme of most ethnic foods: disgustingly unhygienic, unbearably stinky – and irresistible, as Vietnamese will tell you.

“Kamayan” means to eat with one’s hand and eschew spoon, fork and table manners—ah, heaven. Erap had the illusion he had the franchise on this skill. Everybody else was “plastic.”

Street food includes barbecue, lugaw, banana-cue, fishballs, IUD (chicken entrails), adidas (chicken feet), warm taho. Forget hepatitis; here’s cheap, tasty with gritty ambience.

“Pambahay” : Home is where one can let it all hang out, where clothes do not make a man or woman but rather define their level of comfort.

The “barong” enables men to look formal and dignified, without having to strangle themselves with a necktie. Worn well, it makes any ordinary Juan look marvelously makisig.

“Tricycle” and “trisikad” are the poor Pinoy’s taxicab. They deliver you at your doorstep for as little as three pesos. Colorful and reckless “jeepneys” are Everyman’s communal cadillac. Both provide a complimentary dusting of polluted air. Makes for a cheap, interesting ride.

Drivers are usually daredevils and you’re probably right: their licenses are “peke”.

“Aswang, ungno, kapre barang” : The whole underworld of Filipino lower mythology recalls our uniquely bizarre childhood, that is, before political correctness kicked in. Still, their rich adventures pepper our storytelling. “Ukay-Ukay, Midnight madness, weekend sales, bangketas and baratillos.”

It’s retail therapy at its best, with Filipinos braving traffic, crowds, and human deluge to find a bargain.

“Bad taste”. Clear plastic covers on the vinyl-upholstered sofa, posters of poker-playing dogs masquerading as art, overaccessorized jeepneys and cluttered altars. Thee list is endless And wealth only seems to magnify it.

Values remain. “Family” is topgun. On Sundays, family members gather. It’s at its best in times of crisis. Notice how food, hostesses, money, and moral support materialize during a wake? You see that in “OCWs”. The lengths (and miles) we’d go for a better life for our family are proven by these modern-day heroes of the economy. Whether carabao or Arr-neoww-accented, “English” doubles our chances in the global marketplace.

“Bayanihan”. Not just the internationally-renowned dance company, but also this habit of pitching in still common in small communities. Just have cold beer and pulutan ready.

“Bahala na” : We cope with uncertainty by embracing it, and are thus enabled to play life by ear. Yet, these qualities erupted into People Power at EDSA. That’s where everyone became a hero and changed Philippine history overnight. It’s reappeared in Berlin, Jakarta, Prague, Bangkok Beijing — and now in Hong Kong’s yellow ribbons for liberty.

Despite problems, we remain a people of “unbridled optimism”. Is that why we rank so low on the suicide scale? The “Filipino Christmas” is the world’s longest holiday season. It’s the perfect excuse to mix our love for feasting, gift-giving and music and wrap it up with a touch of religion After Christmas, we plunge ahead with fesitivals like Sinulog, Ati-atihan, Moriones. Sounds, colors, pagan frenzy Christian overtones…

“Filipinas” make the best friends, lovers, wives. Too bad you can’t say the same for Filipinos. So maybe Filipinos are bolero and macho with an occasional streak of generic infidelity. But they do know how to make a woman feel like one. And some love cockfighting more than their wives.

Then there is “music “ and “faith.” In 1943, a half-starved Jesuit seminarian detained in a Japanese concentration camp wrote “Jewels of A Pauper”. Horacio de la Costa, S.J. — later to become historian and first Filipino Jesuit provincial – hurriedly wrote it to bridge the intermission in a play called: “Fiesta”

“This pauper among the nations of the earth hides two jewels in her rags,” De la Costa wrote. “One of them is our music. We are sundered from one another by 87 dialects. We are one people when we sing…

“We are again one people when we pray. This is our other treasure: our Faith. It gives somehow to our little unevenful days a kind of splendor, as though they had been touched by a King…”

10G

11-12-2005, 05:59 PM

Mga kababayan, correct me if Im wrong pero yun pong “crab mentality” itself was derrived mula sa mga talangka na pinipilit hilahin yung mga kapwa talangka para makaalis sa timba na kanilang kinalalagyan. in this situation po, the other crabs got pulled down because of those going to the top .
Pero alam nyo po ba na may study na ginawa at ito ang kanilang napatunayan: the crabs below are actually helping the other crabs to be on top and get out of the bucket. I think this means that the connotation for the phrase crab mentality was to be changed by these findings. So the crabs below are actually helping and making teamwork so that other crabs may succeed in getting out of the bucket…sensya na po nakalimutan ko kung saang dyaryo ko it nabasa…i just shared it. anyway, pulling others down just to be on top was really a negative attitude if i may say…but I believe that we should be the one pulling others up when we are on top…this is gratitude for all those who had in one way or another helped us to be on top…

ugnayan

11-13-2005, 06:04 PM

Optimistic View about Philippines!!!

The following was written by INTEL General Manager
Robin Martin about the Philippines:

Filipinos (including the press, business people and
myself) tend to dwell too much on the negative side
and this affects the perception of foreigners, even
the ones who have lived here for a while.

The negative perception of the Philippines is way
disproportionate to reality when compared to countries
like Columbia, Egypt, Middle East, Africa, etc.

Let us all help our country by balancing the negative
with the positive especially when we talk to
foreigners, whether based here or abroad.

Looking back and comparing the Philippines today and
1995 (the year I came back), I was struck by how much
our country has progressed physically.

Consider the following:

  1. The great telecom infrastructure that we have now
    did not exist in 1995. 1995 was the year the telecom
    industry was deregulated. Since then billions of
    dollars have been invested in both fixed line and
    cellular networks producing a system with over 5,000
    kms of fiber optic backbone at a world competitive
    cost. From a fixed line capacity of about 900,000 in
    1995 we now have over 7 million. Cellular phones
    practically did not exist in 1995; now we have over 11
    million line capacity.

  2. The MRT, many of the EDSA flyovers (including the
    Ayala Avenue flyover), the SKYWAY, Rockwell and
    Glorietta 4, the Fort, NAIA terminal 2 and most of the
    new skyscrapers were not yet built in 1995.

  3. If you drive to the provinces, you will notice that
    national roads are now of good quality (international
    quality asphalt roads). I just went to Iba, Zambales
    last week and I was impressed that even a not so
    frequently travelled road was of very good quality.

  4. Philippine exports have increased by 600% over the
    past eight years. There are many, many more examples
    of progress over the last eight years. Philippine
    mangoes are now exported to the US and Europe.

Additional tidbits to make our people prouder:

  1. INTEL has been in the Philippines for 28 years. The
    Philippines plant is where Intel’s most advanced
    products are launched, including the Pentium IV. By
    the end of 2002, Philippine operations are expected to
    be Intel’s biggest assembly and testing operations
    worldwide.

  2. TEXAS INSTRUMENTS has been operating in Baguio for
    over 20 years. The Baguio plant is the largest
    producer of DSP chips in the world. DSP chips are the
    brains behind cellphones. TI’s Baguio plant produces
    the chip that powers 100% of all NOKIA cellphones and
    80% of Erickson cellphones in the world.

  3. TOSHIBA laptops are produced in Santa Rosa, Laguna.

  4. If you drive a BENZ, BMW, or a VOLVO, there is a
    good chance that the ABS system in your car was made in the Philippines.

  5. TREND-MICRO, makers of one of the top anti virus
    software PC-Cillin (I may have mispelled this)
    develops its “cures” for viruses right here in
    Eastwood Libis, Quezon City. When a virus breaks in
    any computer system in the world, they try to find a
    solution within 45 minutes of finding the virus.

  6. By the end of this year, it is expected that a
    majority of the top ten U.S. Call Center firms in the
    U.S. will have set up operations in the Philippines.
    This is one area in which I believe we are the best in
    the world in terms of value for money.

  7. America Online (AOL) has 1,000 people in Clark
    answering 90% of AOL’s global e-mail inquiries.

  8. PROCTOR & GAMBLE has over 400 people right here in
    Makati (average age 23 years) doing back-up office
    work to their Asian operations including finance
    accounting, Human Resources and payments processing.

  9. Among many other things it does for its regional
    operations network in the Asia-Pacific region here in
    Manila, CITIBANK also does its global ATM programming locally.

  10. This is the first year ever that the Philippines
    will be exporting cars in quantity courtesy of FORD
    Philippines.

  11. The government is shedding off graft and
    corruption slowly but surely. This is the first
    time in our histroy that a former president is in jail
    and facing charges of plunder. Despite all odds, we
    are still pursuing the ill-gotten wealth of Marcos now
    enjoyed by his unrepentant heirs.

Next time you travel abroad and meet business
associates tell them the good news. A big part of our
problem is perception and one of the biggest battles
can be won simply by believing and by making others believe.

This message is shared by good citizens of the
Philippines who persevere to hope and work for our country.

PLEASE PASS THIS ON TO OTHER FILIPINOS!!!

One Ring to rule them all, One Ring to find them,
One Ring to bring them all, & in the Darkness bind them.

Raiden

11-13-2005, 07:56 PM

Thank you Ugnayan for that wonderful information. :yesyes:

It brought tears to my eyes. :cry: :slight_smile:

ugnayan

11-13-2005, 08:31 PM

You’re welcome, Raiden! Even in our small ways like forwarding the info above can make a difference…just awhile ago I heard complaints of what’s going on in our homecountry…the caller’s negative statements are coated-curses…I believe we can contribute something for the good of our country and we can start where we are!

“If my people, who are called by my name, will humble themselves and pray and seek my face and turn from their wicked ways, then will I hear from heaven and will forgive their sin and HEAL their land.” II Chronicles 7:17

10G

11-14-2005, 07:42 AM

Ugnayan and All,
Opo, tama po ito! isa din ito sa mga paniniwala ko na unit-unti na magbabago na ang bansa natin. I was working now for a supplier of Intel, in the R and D division,training here in Japan and the Japs management in the Philippine Kojo believes that our Philippine factory shall be on top before 2007 with the help of all Filipinos sent here to Japan.
Tulungan natin ang ating sariling Inang Bayan, sino pa ba ang tutulong sa Pilipinas. Salamat po.
cge po papasok pa ko ng 9am.

fremsite

11-14-2005, 08:10 AM

[quote=ugnayan]Optimistic View about Philippines!!!

  1. If you drive a BENZ, BMW, or a VOLVO, there is a
    good chance that the ABS system in your car was made in the Philippines.

good morning po sa inyo ugnayan …
didn’t know that ABS system of the said cars was made in the philippines ! :smiley:
i am driving a volvo :open_mouth: , i thought … lahat ng parts , made in sweden … hehehe
i mentioned this to my husband and he says " it’s possible " …
thanks for the information …:slight_smile:

gabby

11-14-2005, 01:47 PM

At a loss for words? Try “kuwan, ano”. Then marvel at how Pinoys understand exactly what you want.

= Definitely annoying. If you want to be competent this is a TABOO. Filipinos should change this habit.

Some overseas Filipino workers don’t trust banks. “Pakidala” is their personalized door-to-door remittance and delivery system.

= Bank to bank is very smart thing to do. I do this all the time I remit money.

“Kamayan” means to eat with one’s hand and eschew spoon, fork and table manners—ah, heaven. Erap had the illusion he had the franchise on this skill. Everybody else was “plastic.”

=Kamayan is the Third World countries’ way of eating. I thought it is ours. Bangladesh,Sri lankans and Africans are very proud of it as well.

gabby

11-14-2005, 01:54 PM

Optimistic View about Philippines!!!

The following was written by INTEL General Manager
Robin Martin about the Philippines:

Filipinos (including the press, business people and
myself) tend to dwell too much on the negative side
and this affects the perception of foreigners, even
the ones who have lived here for a while.

The negative perception of the Philippines is way
disproportionate to reality when compared to countries
like Columbia, Egypt, Middle East, Africa, etc.

Let us all help our country by balancing the negative
with the positive especially when we talk to
foreigners, whether based here or abroad.

Looking back and comparing the Philippines today and
1995 (the year I came back), I was struck by how much
our country has progressed physically.

Consider the following:

  1. The great telecom infrastructure that we have now
    did not exist in 1995. 1995 was the year the telecom
    industry was deregulated. Since then billions of
    dollars have been invested in both fixed line and
    cellular networks producing a system with over 5,000
    kms of fiber optic backbone at a world competitive
    cost. From a fixed line capacity of about 900,000 in
    1995 we now have over 7 million. Cellular phones
    practically did not exist in 1995; now we have over 11
    million line capacity.

  2. The MRT, many of the EDSA flyovers (including the
    Ayala Avenue flyover), the SKYWAY, Rockwell and
    Glorietta 4, the Fort, NAIA terminal 2 and most of the
    new skyscrapers were not yet built in 1995.

  3. If you drive to the provinces, you will notice that
    national roads are now of good quality (international
    quality asphalt roads). I just went to Iba, Zambales
    last week and I was impressed that even a not so
    frequently travelled road was of very good quality.

  4. Philippine exports have increased by 600% over the
    past eight years. There are many, many more examples
    of progress over the last eight years. Philippine
    mangoes are now exported to the US and Europe.

Additional tidbits to make our people prouder:

  1. INTEL has been in the Philippines for 28 years. The
    Philippines plant is where Intel’s most advanced
    products are launched, including the Pentium IV. By
    the end of 2002, Philippine operations are expected to
    be Intel’s biggest assembly and testing operations
    worldwide.

  2. TEXAS INSTRUMENTS has been operating in Baguio for
    over 20 years. The Baguio plant is the largest
    producer of DSP chips in the world. DSP chips are the
    brains behind cellphones. TI’s Baguio plant produces
    the chip that powers 100% of all NOKIA cellphones and
    80% of Erickson cellphones in the world.

  3. TOSHIBA laptops are produced in Santa Rosa, Laguna.

  4. If you drive a BENZ, BMW, or a VOLVO, there is a
    good chance that the ABS system in your car was made in the Philippines.

  5. TREND-MICRO, makers of one of the top anti virus
    software PC-Cillin (I may have mispelled this)
    develops its “cures” for viruses right here in
    Eastwood Libis, Quezon City. When a virus breaks in
    any computer system in the world, they try to find a
    solution within 45 minutes of finding the virus.

  6. By the end of this year, it is expected that a
    majority of the top ten U.S. Call Center firms in the
    U.S. will have set up operations in the Philippines.
    This is one area in which I believe we are the best in
    the world in terms of value for money.

  7. America Online (AOL) has 1,000 people in Clark
    answering 90% of AOL’s global e-mail inquiries.

  8. PROCTOR & GAMBLE has over 400 people right here in
    Makati (average age 23 years) doing back-up office
    work to their Asian operations including finance
    accounting, Human Resources and payments processing.

  9. Among many other things it does for its regional
    operations network in the Asia-Pacific region here in
    Manila, CITIBANK also does its global ATM programming locally.

  10. This is the first year ever that the Philippines
    will be exporting cars in quantity courtesy of FORD
    Philippines.

  11. The government is shedding off graft and
    corruption slowly but surely. This is the first
    time in our histroy that a former president is in jail
    and facing charges of plunder. Despite all odds, we
    are still pursuing the ill-gotten wealth of Marcos now
    enjoyed by his unrepentant heirs.

Next time you travel abroad and meet business
associates tell them the good news. A big part of our
problem is perception and one of the biggest battles
can be won simply by believing and by making others believe.

This message is shared by good citizens of the
Philippines who persevere to hope and work for our country.

PLEASE PASS THIS ON TO OTHER FILIPINOS!!!

One Ring to rule them all, One Ring to find them,
One Ring to bring them all, & in the Darkness bind them.

I think we need more foreign investments and local as well. But we should get local businessmen to invest more their money in the Philippines and develop Philippine Market. The problem is not perception but the actual reality in the Philippines. Political instability is absobloodylutely bad for business.

butchw5

11-14-2005, 06:56 PM

kanina lang meron kaming bisita na farmer kasama ang isang sales rep ng aming company. ako ang nagentertain and showed him around our research station. all the while akala nya ay japanese ako. akalo ko naman when i was introduced to him by our sales rep he got the point that i was not a japanese. sabi ko no i am not, i am a ‘FILIPINO’. nabigla siya kasi he was learning from a filipino not sa kapuwa nya na japanese. anyway i had to give him my business/name card. :cool:

docomo

11-14-2005, 06:58 PM

kanina lang meron kaming bisita na farmer kasama ang isang sales rep ng aming company. ako ang nagentertain and showed him around our research station. all the while akala nya ay japanese ako. akalo ko naman when i was introduced to him by our sales rep he got the point that i was not a japanese. sabi ko no i am not, i am a ‘FILIPINO’. nabigla siya kasi he was learning from a filipino not sa kapuwa nya na japanese. anyway i had to give him my business/name card. :cool:

That’s good to hear , gambatte :slight_smile:

makulit

11-15-2005, 05:25 AM

Optimistic View about Philippines!!!

The following was written by INTEL General Manager
Robin Martin about the Philippines:

Filipinos (including the press, business people and
myself) tend to dwell too much on the negative side
and this affects the perception of foreigners, even
the ones who have lived here for a while.

The negative perception of the Philippines is way
disproportionate to reality when compared to countries
like Columbia, Egypt, Middle East, Africa, etc.

Let us all help our country by balancing the negative
with the positive especially when we talk to
foreigners, whether based here or abroad.

Looking back and comparing the Philippines today and
1995 (the year I came back), I was struck by how much
our country has progressed physically.

Consider the following:

  1. The great telecom infrastructure that we have now
    did not exist in 1995. 1995 was the year the telecom
    industry was deregulated. Since then billions of
    dollars have been invested in both fixed line and
    cellular networks producing a system with over 5,000
    kms of fiber optic backbone at a world competitive
    cost. From a fixed line capacity of about 900,000 in
    1995 we now have over 7 million. Cellular phones
    practically did not exist in 1995; now we have over 11
    million line capacity.

  2. The MRT, many of the EDSA flyovers (including the
    Ayala Avenue flyover), the SKYWAY, Rockwell and
    Glorietta 4, the Fort, NAIA terminal 2 and most of the
    new skyscrapers were not yet built in 1995.

  3. If you drive to the provinces, you will notice that
    national roads are now of good quality (international
    quality asphalt roads). I just went to Iba, Zambales
    last week and I was impressed that even a not so
    frequently travelled road was of very good quality.

  4. Philippine exports have increased by 600% over the
    past eight years. There are many, many more examples
    of progress over the last eight years. Philippine
    mangoes are now exported to the US and Europe.

Additional tidbits to make our people prouder:

  1. INTEL has been in the Philippines for 28 years. The
    Philippines plant is where Intel’s most advanced
    products are launched, including the Pentium IV. By
    the end of 2002, Philippine operations are expected to
    be Intel’s biggest assembly and testing operations
    worldwide.

  2. TEXAS INSTRUMENTS has been operating in Baguio for
    over 20 years. The Baguio plant is the largest
    producer of DSP chips in the world. DSP chips are the
    brains behind cellphones. TI’s Baguio plant produces
    the chip that powers 100% of all NOKIA cellphones and
    80% of Erickson cellphones in the world.

  3. TOSHIBA laptops are produced in Santa Rosa, Laguna.

  4. If you drive a BENZ, BMW, or a VOLVO, there is a
    good chance that the ABS system in your car was made in the Philippines.

  5. TREND-MICRO, makers of one of the top anti virus
    software PC-Cillin (I may have mispelled this)
    develops its “cures” for viruses right here in
    Eastwood Libis, Quezon City. When a virus breaks in
    any computer system in the world, they try to find a
    solution within 45 minutes of finding the virus.

  6. By the end of this year, it is expected that a
    majority of the top ten U.S. Call Center firms in the
    U.S. will have set up operations in the Philippines.
    This is one area in which I believe we are the best in
    the world in terms of value for money.

  7. America Online (AOL) has 1,000 people in Clark
    answering 90% of AOL’s global e-mail inquiries.

  8. PROCTOR & GAMBLE has over 400 people right here in
    Makati (average age 23 years) doing back-up office
    work to their Asian operations including finance
    accounting, Human Resources and payments processing.

  9. Among many other things it does for its regional
    operations network in the Asia-Pacific region here in
    Manila, CITIBANK also does its global ATM programming locally.

  10. This is the first year ever that the Philippines
    will be exporting cars in quantity courtesy of FORD
    Philippines.

  11. The government is shedding off graft and
    corruption slowly but surely. This is the first
    time in our histroy that a former president is in jail
    and facing charges of plunder. Despite all odds, we
    are still pursuing the ill-gotten wealth of Marcos now
    enjoyed by his unrepentant heirs.

Next time you travel abroad and meet business
associates tell them the good news. A big part of our
problem is perception and one of the biggest battles
can be won simply by believing and by making others believe.

This message is shared by good citizens of the
Philippines who persevere to hope and work for our country.
0
PLEASE PASS THIS ON TO OTHER FILIPINOS!!!

One Ring to rule them all, One Ring to find them,
One Ring to bring them all, & in the Darkness bind them.

luma na ito, this was circulated year 2002. its 2005, a lot had happened in philippines the last 3 years. marami nang international companies na nagsara (like FedEx) at lumipat sa China.

10G

11-16-2005, 12:58 AM

makulit-san, medyo luma na nga yan but I suggest that let us be on the optimistic side. we are what we repeatedly do, hindi baga? there cannot be a single man who could uplift our Nation, there should be us…all of us that think positively and reacts positively. sabi nga ng aking ama" walang tutulong sa ating pamilya anak kundi tayo"…

richie

11-19-2005, 09:07 PM

It never crossed my mind to be other than a Pinoy:)

ugnayan

11-20-2005, 03:48 AM

SALAMAT sa confirmation mo, 10G! Natutuwa ako na sinabi mo na nagtratrabaho ka sa supplier ng Intel at may vision-mission ang kumpanya ninyo para sa kaunlaran ng ating bayan! Nawa’y marami pa tayong mahikayat na maging positibo sa kinabukasan ng Pilipinas at itanim sa isipan nila na tayo ay magtulungan. God bless our nation at sa iyo, kabayan!

ugnayan

11-21-2005, 05:16 PM

Anong positibong aksyon na magagawa natin sa sulat na ipinadala…

Eye Opener: Walang kwenta ang Pilipinas
By: Jawbreaker (isang ordinaryong office worker na ayaw na magbayad ng tax…ever!)

Hindi ko na mapigilan ang sarili ko. Sukang-suka na ko sa mga nangyayari sa bansang 'to! Walang katapusang corruption, walang kamatayang pangbabatikos, pagbabatuhan ng tae at pagpapa-taasan ng ihi ng mga pulitiko sa bawat isa, walang tigil na imbestigasyon ng kung ano-anong isyu pero wala namang matinong resolusyon, walang puknat na pag-aagawan ng kapangyarihan sa pagitan ng mga partido, patuloy na pagdami ng tamad at tangang Pilipino, patuloy na pakikipaglaban ng ideolohiyang
wala namang silbi.

Ang gobyerno ng Pilipinas, talo pa ang septic tank na hinihigop ng Malabanan ? Saksakan ng dumi at napakabaho. Kaya hindi nakakapagtaka na ang Pilipinas ang isa sa pinakamahirap at corrupt na bansa sa mundo. Kasi lahat sila bulok, lahat sila walang kwenta. Lahat sila sugapa sa kapangyarihan at sa pera.

KAHIT KRISTIYANO AKO, HINDI KO MAPIGILANG MAGMURA AT HILINGIN SA DIYOS (MINSAN NGA PATI SA DEMONYO) NA MAMATAY NA SILANG LAHAT AT I-BBQ SILA NG HABANG-BUHAY SA IMPIERNO.

SINONG “SILA”? EH DI MGA CORRUPT NA GOVERNMENT OFFICIALS AND WORKERS, MGA TAMBAY NA PILIPINO NA ANG LALAKI NG KATAWAN PERO HINDI NAMAN NAGTRATRABAHO AT HINDI NAGBABAYAD NG TAX, MGA MAYAYAMAN AT ARISTANG TAX EVADERS, PATI MGA AKTIBISTA, NPA AT IBA PANG IDEOLOGICAL GROUPS NA HINDI NAGBABAYAD NG TAX PERO PANG-GULO!!!

Lagi na lang sinasabi ng mga pulitiko: Ipaglaban ang masa! Tulungan ang masa! Mahalin ang masa!

PUNYETA! MASA LANG BA ANG TAO SA PILIPINAS?

SINO BA TALAGA ANG BUMUBUHAY SA PUNYETANG BANSANG TO?

SAAN BA GALING ANG PANGPAGAWA NG MGA TULAY AT KALYE? SAAN BA GALING ANG PORK BARREL? SAAN BA GALING ANG PERANG KINUKURAKOT NYO?

KAMI NA MGA MANGGAGAWA AT MIDDLE CLASS NA BAGO PA MAKUHA ANG SWELDO BAWAS NA ? KAMI ANG BUMUBUHAY SA WALANG KWENTANG BANSA NA 'TO!!!

BAKIT YANG BANG MGA MASANG YAN NA LAGI NA LANG SENTRO NG PLATAPORMA NG MGA PULITIKO EH NAGBABAYAD BA NG TAX!!!

KAHIT ISA SA MGA NAG-RA-RALLYING MGA SQUATTER NA YAN, KAHIT SINGKO HINDI NAG-RE-REMIT YAN SA BIR!

PERO PINAPAKINGGAN BA KAMI NG GOBYERNO?

LAGI NA LANG OPINYON NG MASA ANG INIINTINDI NG GOBYERNO.

KUNG SINO ANG NAG-RA-RALLY, SA EDSA, SILA ANG NASUSUNOD.

KUNG SINO ANG MAS MALAKAS SUMIGAW PERO WALA NAMANG ECONOMIC CONTRIBUTION, SILA LAGI ANG FOCUS PAG MAY PROBLEMA.

SILA LAGI ANG BIDA.

KAMING MGA ORDINARYONG OFFICE WORKERS, OFW’S, LABORERS AT IBA PANG NAG-TRA-TRABAHO AT NAGBABAYAD NG TAX ? KAMI ANG NAGPAPAKAHIRAP PARA BUHAYIN ANG PILIPINAS. KAMI ANG MGA TUNAY NA BAYANI NG BANSA!!!

Tuwing nakikita ko ang payslip ko, nag-iinit ang ulo ko at gusto kong maiyak sa inis. Napakalaki ng tax na binabawas sa akin pero ginagamit lang sa walang kwentang bagay ang perang pinaghirapan ko.

Lahat ng pagtitipid ginagawa ko para suportahan ang sarili ko, pamilya ko at ang punyetang bansang to. Ni hindi ako makabili ng chicken and spaghetti meal sa Jollibee kahit gutom na gutom na ko. Nag-tya-tyaga ako sa waffle na tig-P10, o kaya pag may konting pera, junior bola-bola siopao sa Mini-Stop sa halangang P20.

Eh kung yung pera ko na pinapangbabayad sa tax sa kin na lang napunta, eh di sana nakakapanood pa ko ng sine at least 2 beses sa isang buwan. Nakabili na sana ako ng bagong rubber shoes. Nakapagpagawa na sana ako ng sarili kong bahay.

Yung tax na binabayad ko, karamihan nun derecho sa bulsa ng mga corrupt na mga government officials at workers. Habang hirap na hirap akong i-budget ang pera ko, sila naman nagpapakasarap sa mga mansyon. SUV’s at luxury cars pa ang dina-drive nila, samantalang ako sa pedicab lang sumasakay!

PERA KO YANG PINAPAGPAPASASAAN NYO!!!

Yung tax na binabayad ko, pinapangsuporta sa mga mahihirap. Saan ba galing ang pera pangpagawa ng housing at pagtulong sa mga mahihirap, di ba sa mga manggagawa na nagbabayad ng buwis! Pero karamihan ng mahihirap, kung umasta kala mo inaapi sila ng sobra.

SA TOTOO LANG NO, KAYA ANG MGA MAHIHIRAP LALONG NAGHIHIRAP KASI MGA TAMAD!

Ang daming mga tambay sa kalye na walang trabaho pero ang laki ng katawan. Eh kung sila ba nagkargador sa pier eh di sana may pera sila.

TAPOS WALA NA NGANG PERA, ANAK PA NG ANAK!

LALO NYO LANG PINAPADAMI ANG TAMAD AT TANGA SA MUNDO!!!

Naaawa ako sa mga batang pakalat-kalat sa kalye at namamalimos. Imbes na nag-aaral, dumadagdag lang sila sa bilang ng mga future criminals sa Pinas. Hindi ako magtataka na yung batang nakita kong namamalimos sa Cubao, pagkatapos ng ilang taon cellphone snatcher na.

YUNG MGA MAGULANG NAMAN DYAN, COMMON SENSE LANG! HIRAP NA HIRAP NA NGA KAYO SA BUHAY, MANGDADAMAY PA KAYO NG IBA?! PAPARAMIHAN NYO PA LAHI NYO!

Palibhasa walang mga trabaho at walang pinagkaka-abalahan, kaya nagkakalabitan at nagsusundutan na lang maghapon, magdamag. Sa totoo lang, nakakabilib. Kasi kahit sa ilalim ng tulay o sa kariton lang, nakakabuo pa rin ng bata! Ibig sabihin, maabilidad ang mga Pinoy. Kung gugustuhin, gagawan ng paraan. Kahit sa makipot, mabaho at maduming lugar ? SOLVE!

Isa pang mga grupo ng tao na nakakainis, yung mga aktibista, NPA at kung ano-ano pang ideological political groups. Sabi nila, mahal na mahal nila ang Pilipinas kaya pinagpalalaban nila ang kanilang mga adhikain.

EH HINDI RIN KAYO NAGBABAYAD NG TAX! ANG KAKAPAL RIN NG MGA MUKHA NYO!

MGA IPOKRITO! MAHAL DAW ANG PILIPINAS AYAW NAMAN MAGBAYAD NG BUWIS!

BAKIT MAY BIR COLLECTOR BA SA GITNA NG MENDIOLA AT EDSA?! MAY TAX COLLECTION BA SA BUNDOK?!

WALA DIN NAMAN KAYONG MGA TRABAHO! KUNG MAY TRABAHO TALAGA KAYO, HINDI KAYO MAG-RA-RALLY DAHIL SAYANG ANG SWELDO NYO PAG ABSENT KAYO!

PAANO NYO MAIPAPAKITA ANG PAGMAMAHAL NYO SA PILIPINAS KUNG WALA NA KAYONG GAWANG MATINO KUNDI MAG-RALLY AT MAMUNDOK??!!!

ISA PA YANG MGA MAYAYAMAN AT MGA ARTISTA, NA NANGDADAYA AT HINDI NAGBABAYAD NG BUWIS. ANG KAKAPAL NG MUKHA NYO! ANG DAMI NYO NA NGANG PERA NANGDADAYA PA KAYO SA TAX!!! HINDI NYO NAMAN MADADALA SA IMPIERNO YANG MGA KAYAMAN NYO. MASUSUNOG LANG DUN YAN.

KAYA LALONG BUMABAGSAK ANG NEGOSYO DITO SA PILIPINAS, KASI MGA NEGOSYANTE MANDARAYA. PATI SHOWBIZ INDUSTRY, BAGSAK NA DIN. KARMA ANG TAWAG DYAN. MGA BALASUBAS KASI.

Sana magkaron ng POLITICAL AND NATIONAL CLEANSING.

Alisin (mas maganda kung patayin na lang) ang lahat ng pulitiko at political families sa puwesto. Tibagin ang lahat ng mapanirang organizations at grupo. Itapon sa malayong isla o kaya i-pwersa ng hard labor ang mga sobrang tamad na mga Pilipino. Ihiwalay ang mga bata sa kanilang mga tamad at tangang magulang upang makapag-aral sila at maturuan na maging mabuting tao at mamamayan. Magkaron ng bagong lider na walang political ties at utang na loob sa kahit sino. At higit sa lahat, dapat tax payers lang ang pwedeng bumoto!

Kung kinakailangang magka-giyera para magtino ang mga Pilipino, ayos lang. Masyado na kasing matigas ang ulo ng mga tao dito. Gusto ng kalayaan, pero hindi naman handang panagutan ang responsibilidad ng pagiging malaya. Meron daw pinaglalaban na prinsipyo at adhikain pero takot namang mamatay para dito.

(Sa mga nakaka-alam sa anime na Gundam Wing, yan ang inspirasyon ko sa new Pinas hehe. I love you Zechs! I love you Treize!)

Hangga’t hindi nagkakaron ng radical change, patuloy na walang kwenta ang Pilipinas at patuloy na magiging tanga ang majority ng mga Pilipino.

Sa dami ng nag-mi-migrate na Pilipino sa ibang bansa, dadating ang panahon na minority na lang ng population sa Pilipinas ang may utak. Yung mga magagaling na Pilipino, malamang maubos na. Sobra na kasi silang na-fru-frustrate at na-de-depress sa mga nakikita nila.

Ilang taon pa at aalis na rin ako sa Pilipinas. Wala kong balak na magkaron ng pamilya sa isang bansa na hindi pinapahalagahan ang kontribusyon ng mga taong tunay na bumubuhay dito. Kawawa naman ang magiging anak ko kung dito sya mabubuhay.

Sa totoo lang, broken hearted ako. Minahal ko din ang bansang ito. Pilit kong pinagtatanggol kahit bulok. Nakarating na ko ng ibang bansa, pero pinili kong bumalik. Pero ngayon, ayoko na. Suko na ko. Sayang lang ako sa bansang to. Simple lang naman ang hiling ko. Gusto ko lang mabuhay ng tahimik at maayos. Gusto ko na kahit paano eh maipagmalaki ang Pilipinas. Pero wala eh. Doomed to be jologs ang bansang to.

Alam ko marami pa ang umaasa at naniniwala sa pagbabago. Good luck and God bless! Sana tama kayo at mali ako.

kisha57

11-21-2005, 05:56 PM

Tama po kayo sa lahat ng isinulat nyo.Isang nakamamatay na katotohanan ng bansang sinilangan.Isang dahilan po iyan kaya ko piniling manirahan dito sa ibang bansa.Ngunit patuloy pa rin kaming maghahanapbuhay dito para sa pamilya namin.Hindi po ako nagbibigay sa tamad.
Kailian kaya sila mapupuksa? Sana makarating sa kanila ang sulat nyo.

aprilluck

11-22-2005, 07:19 PM

Why is the Filipino Special?

Filipinos are Brown. Their color is in the center of human racial strains.

This point is not an attempt at racism, but just for many Filipinos to realize that our color should not be a source of or reason for inferiority complex. While we pine for a fair complexion, the white people are religiously tanning themselves, whenever they could, under the sun or some artificial light, just to approximate the Filipino complexion.

Filipinos are a touching people. We have lots of love and are not afraid to show it. We almost inevitably create human chains with our perennial akbay (putting an arm around another shoulder), hawak (hold),yakap (embrace), himas (caressing stroke), kalabit (touch with the tip of the finger), kalong (sitting on someone else’s lap), etc.

We are always reaching out, always seeking interconnection. Filipinos are linguists. Put a Filipino in any city, any town around the world. Give him a few months or even weeks and he will speak the local language there.Filipinos are adept at learning and speaking languages. In fact, it is not uncommon for Filipinos to speak at least three: his dialect, Filipino, and English. Of course, a lot speak an added language, be it Chinese, Spanish or, if he works abroad, the language of his host country.

In addition, Tagalog is not ‘sexist.’ While many “conscious” and “enlightened” people of today are just by now striving to be “politically correct” with their language and, in the process, bend to absurd depths in coining “gender sensitive” words, Tagalog has, since time immemorial, evolved gender-neutral words like asawa (husband or wife), anak (son or daughter), magulang (father or mother), kapatid (brother or sister), biyenan ( father-in-law or mother-in-law), manugang (son or daughter-in-law), bayani (hero or heroine), etc. Our languages and dialects are advanced and, indeed, sophisticated! It is no small wonder that Jose Rizal, the quintessential Filipino, spoke some twenty-two languages!

Filipinos are groupists. We love human inter-action and company. We always surround ourselves with people and we hover over them, too. According to Dr. Patricia Licuanan, a psychologist from Ateneo and Miriam College, an average Filipino would have and know at least 300 relatives.

At work, we live bayanihan (mutual help); at play, we want a kalaro (playmate) more than laruan (toy). At socials, our invitations are open and it is more common even for guests to invite and bring in other guests. In transit, we do not want to be separated from our group. So what do we do when there is no more space in a vehicle?

Kalung-kalong! (Sit on one another). No one would ever suggest splitting a group and waiting for another vehicle with more space! Filipinos are weavers. One look at our baskets, mats, clothes, and other crafts will reveal the skill of the Filipino weaver and his inclination to weaving. This art is a metaphor of the Filipino trait. We are social weavers. ! We weave theirs into ours that we all become parts of one another. We place a lot of premium on pakikisama (getting along) and pakikipagkapwa (relating). Two of the worst labels, walang pakikipagkapwa (inability to relate), will be avoided by the Filipino at almost any cost.

We love to blend and harmonize with people, we like to include them in our “tribe,” in our “family”-and we like to be included in other people’s families, too.

Therefore we call our friend’s mother nanay or mommy; we call a friend’s sister ate (eldest sister), and so on. We even call strangers tia (aunt) or tio (uncle), tatang (grandfather), etc.

So extensive is our social openness and interrelations that we have specific title for extended relations like hipag (sister-in-law’s spouse), balae (child-in-law’s parents), inaanak (godchild), ninong/ninang (godparents) kinakapatid (godparent’s child), etc.

In addition, we have the profound ‘ka’ institution, loosely translated as “equal to the same kind” as in kasama (of the same company), kaisa (of the same cause), kapanalig (of the same belief), etc. In our social fiber, we treat other people as co-equals.

Filipinos, because of their social “weaving” traditions, make for excellent team workers.

Filipinos are adventurers. We have a tradition of separation. Our myths and legends speak of heroes and heroines who almost always get separated from their families and loved ones and are taken by circumstances to far-away lands where they find wealth or power.

Our Spanish colonial history is filled with separations caused by the reduccion (hamleting), and the forced migration to build towns, churches, fortresses or galleons. American occupation enlarged the space of Filipino wandering, including America, and there are documented evidences of Filipino presence in America as far back as 1587.

Now, Filipinos compose the world’s largest population of overseas workers, populating and sometimes “threshing” major capitals, minor towns and even remote villages around the world. Filipino adventurism has made us today’s citizens of the world, bringing the bagoong (salty shrimp paste), pansit (sautéed noodles), siopao (meat-filled dough), kare-kare (peanut-flavored dish), dinuguan (innards cooked in pork blood), balut (unhatched duck egg), and adobo (meat vinaigrette), including the tabo (ladle) and tsinelas (slippers) all over the world.

Filipinos are excellent at adjustments and improvisation, managing to recreate their home, or to feel at home anywhere.

Filipinos have Pakiramdam (deep feeling/discernment) . We know how to feel what others feel, sometimes even anticipate what they will feel. Being manhid (dense) is one of the worst labels anyone could get and will therefore, avoid at all cost. We know when a guest is hungry though the insistence on being full is assured.

We can tell if people are lovers even if they are miles apart. We know if a person is offended though he may purposely smile. We know because we feel. In our pakikipagkapwa(relat ing), we get not only to wear another man’s shoe but also his heart.

We have a superbly developed and honored gift of discernment, making us excellent leaders, counselors, and go-betweens. Filipinos are very spiritual. We are transcendent. We transcend the physical world, see the unseen and hear the unheard. We have a deep sense of kaba (premonition) and kutob (hunch). A Filipino wife will instinctively feel her husband or child is going astray, whether or not telltale signs present themselves.

Filipino spirituality makes him invoke divine presence or intervention at nearly every bend of his journey. Rightly or wrongly, Filipinos are almost always acknowledging, invoking or driving away spirits into and from their lives. Seemingly trivial or even incoherent events can take on spiritual significance and will be given such space or consideration.

The Filipino has a sophisticated, developed pakiramdam. The Filipino, though becoming more and more modern (hence, materialistic) is still very spiritual in essence. This inherent and deep spirituality makes the Filipino, once correctly Christianized, a major exponent of the faith.

Filipinos are timeless. Despite the nearly half-a-millennium encroachment of the western clock into our lives, Filipinos-unless on very formal or official functions-still measure time not with hours and minutes but with feeling. This style is ingrained deep in our psyche. Our time is diffused, not framed. Our appointments are defined by umaga (morning), tanghali (noon), hapon (afternoon), or gabi (evening).

Our most exact time reference is probably katanghaliang-tapat (high noon), which still allows many minutes of leeway. That is how Filipino trysts and occasions are timed: there is really no definite time.

A Filipino event has no clear-cut beginning or ending. We have a fiesta , but there is bisperas (eve), a day after the fiesta is still considered a good time to visit. The Filipino Christmas is not confined to December 25th; it somehow begins months before December and extends up to the first days of January.

Filipinos say good-bye to guests first at the head of the stairs, then down to the descamo (landing), to the entresuelo (mezzanine), to the pintuan (doorway), to the tarangkahan (gate), and if the departing persons are to take public transportation, up to the bus stop or bus station.

In a way, other people’s tardiness and extended stays can really be annoying, but this peculiarity is the same charm of Filipinos, who being governed by timelessness, can show how to find more time to be nice, kind, and accommodating than his prompt and exact brothers elsewhere.

Filipinos are Spaceless. As in the concept of time, the Filipino concept of space is not numerical. We will not usually express expanse of space with miles or kilometers but with feelings in how we say malayo (far) or malapit (near).

Alongside with numberlessness, Filipino space is also boundless. Indigenous culture did not divide land nto private lots but kept it open for all to partake of its abundance.

The Filipino has avidly remained “spaceless” in many ways. The interior of the bahay-kubo (hut) can easily become receiving room, sleeping room, kitchen, dining room, chapel, wake parlor, etc. Depending on the time of the day or the needs of the moment. The same is true with the bahay na bato (stone house). Space just flows into the next space that the divisions between the sala, caida, comedor, or vilada may only be faintly suggested by overhead arches of filigree. In much the same way, Filipino concept of space can be so diffused that one 's party may creep into and actually expropriate the street! A family business like a sari-sari store or talyer may extend to the sidewalk and street. Provincial folks dry palayan (rice grain) on the highways! Religious groups of various persuasions habitually and matter-of-factly commandeer the streets for processions and parades.

It is not uncommon to close a street to accommodate private functions, Filipinos eat, sleep, chat, socialize, quarrel, even urinate, nearly everywhere or just anywhere!

“Spacelessness,” in the face of modern, especially urban life, can be unlawful and may really be counter-productive. On the other hand, Filipino spacelessness, when viewed from his context, is just another manifestation of his spiritually and communal values. Adapted well to today’s context, which may mean unstoppable urbanization, Filipino spacelessness may even be the answer and counter balance to humanity’s greed, selfishness and isolation.

So what makes the Filipino special? We are brown, spiritual, timeless, spaceless, linguists, groupists, weavers, adventurers. Seldom do all these profound qualities find personification in a people. Filipinos should allow - and should be allowed to contribute their special traits to the world-wide community of men - but first, we should know and like ourselves.

(Written by Ed Lapiz) Thank you Mr. Ed Lapiz for reminding me about our tradition,cultures,t he language, and most of all the nature of Filipinos and because of this, it makes me more proud to be a Filipino,I agree with you that Filipinos are touching people ,let me mention about my experience here,I’m working with japanese women and because I’m a very touching person, I usually greet my co-workers with akbay,hawak sa kamay even sa baywang with a matching light kiss on the cheek (beso-beso ba tawag doon?)Knowing Japanese ,they aren’t accustumed to it, so first they felt awkward but not now ,I influenced them and they learned that touching is one way to show your affection to somebody .So would you believe that because of this I made our working place less-tensions ,almost everyone starts working with a smile ,joking ,touching (may kasama pang sundot sa puwit).
Then about what you have said that Filipinos are groupist ,Yes we are !I wrote a qoute about X-mas that proves I’m a certified groupist in a way I organised and host a x-mas party with my co-workers yearly, although preparing party is not a joke, it’s really tiring and i must sacrifice a day off and a sound sleep to cook all night long for our yearly event but still it’s worth !and at the same time I intruduced Filipino dishes to my co-workers and they love it and got some recipe of our Filipino dishes.
These are only some of the things I may say I’m proud to be a Filipino even I married a Japanese ,although I have kids that don’t speak tagalog fluently ,'though I’m living in a foreign land ,even I have a rare chance to speak Tagalog everyday ,glad to be a member of TF,at least now a have a chance to read and write and express my opinions to our kababayan.
Mabuhay ! and maging Pilipino sa isip ,sa salita at sa gawa !!!
Ugnayan ,some words naman diyan …waitin g , aprilluck.

ugnayan

11-22-2005, 08:03 PM

Aprilluck, salamat sa response mo at pagbabahagi ng pakiki-ugnayan mo sa mga Hapon! Hinahangaan ko ang sakripisyo mo sa pag-organize ng Christmas parties at pagtuturo ng kultura natin. Malaking tulong sa emotional & social life ng mga Hapon ang ginagawa mo. Napapabago mo rin ang masamang tingin o generalization patungkol sa kababayan natin sa magandang asal at ehemplo mo. Basahin sa ibang thread/forum ang mga sulat ko tungkol sa kababayan natin sa Japan at sa iba’t-ibang bansa…nagpapadala rin ako ng clean Jokes para masabi na pwede pa rin tayong magsaya o tumawa na walang malisya ang sinasabi o green jokes…pang-alis din ng stress at magandang ice-breaker sa group dynamics! Keep up the good work! God bless you & your family!

ugnayan

11-22-2005, 08:16 PM

kisha57, magandang araw sa iyo! Sige lang maghanap buhay tayo at sa pagtulong ay di naman gawin “dependent” sila sa atin. Ika nga, “Give a fish each day to your beneficiary & you create dependency on you. Teach them how to fish and they’ll know how to survive for a lifetime.”

Turuan at maging honest tayo sa mga tinutulungan natin lalo na sa pamilya natin. Mahirap din na tumutulong tayo na 'di maluwang sa loob. Mainam na sabihin na may hangganan at sabihin na magtulungan at di sila aasa sa iyo habang buhay. Malaki ang expectation sa ating naka-abroad…marami rin kasi na sa mga umuuwi o nagkukwento na parang madali ang pera sa abroad (ginapiko, ginapala, gid!)…maganda na maging totoo tayo palagi! Ikalat natin ito sa mga kababayan natin. Pagpalain ka ng Diyos sa inyong pagsusumikap!

butchw5

11-23-2005, 08:51 AM

i am proud to be a filipino. everyone around me think i am a japanese (kasi ako lang ang 外国人). in everything i do it reflects not only me but my fellow countrymen and country in general. kaya making the best of what my job relates me to do, i do it to the best of my ability (kaya siguro hindi ako malipat sa ibang station/s namin). mabuhay ang pilipino!

ugnayan

11-23-2005, 01:08 PM

Great to know you’re excelling as a Filipino overseas worker! Keep that up, Butchw5! With your good example, you’re indeed doing service to our country and countrymen. Hikayatin natin ang ibang kababayan natin na maging magandang halimbawa rin sila sa mga kapwa manggagawa. Dahil nga nilalahat ang mga Filipino sa Japan, nawa’y sa aksyon, attitude at paghahayag natin ay maiba ang pagtingin sa atin. Take care and God bless you sa inyong misyon sa buhay!

katty0531

11-24-2005, 03:00 PM

Back to the question, I am proud to be myself also…because of who i am as a person, not because of my country and so on…

goodboy

11-24-2005, 06:10 PM

Im proud to be a Filipino! though our nation might not be perfect at all, we still have these values, culture, customs, music and products that im very proud of. Though most pinoys are disappointed with the way democracy works in the country and are not proud of our political system, still the great majority of them are proud to be Filipino and that includes me.
We have a city that floods everytime there is a rainstorm and loses electricity with a clap of a thunder, roads have a full of potholes, unrepaired roads and rude drivers and we have a war in Mindanao that nobody seems to have a clue how to settle….these are some of the things that makes our nation different. These facts hurt me, but in spite of everything, I still love the Philippines and im proud to be a Filipino!

richie

11-25-2005, 11:17 AM

Optimistic View about Philippines!!!

The following was written by INTEL General Manager
Robin Martin about the Philippines:

Filipinos (including the press, business people and
myself) tend to dwell too much on the negative side
and this affects the perception of foreigners, even
the ones who have lived here for a while.

The negative perception of the Philippines is way
disproportionate to reality when compared to countries
like Columbia, Egypt, Middle East, Africa, etc.

Let us all help our country by balancing the negative
with the positive especially when we talk to
foreigners, whether based here or abroad.

Looking back and comparing the Philippines today and
1995 (the year I came back), I was struck by how much
our country has progressed physically.

Consider the following:

  1. The great telecom infrastructure that we have now
    did not exist in 1995. 1995 was the year the telecom
    industry was deregulated. Since then billions of
    dollars have been invested in both fixed line and
    cellular networks producing a system with over 5,000
    kms of fiber optic backbone at a world competitive
    cost. From a fixed line capacity of about 900,000 in
    1995 we now have over 7 million. Cellular phones
    practically did not exist in 1995; now we have over 11
    million line capacity.

  2. The MRT, many of the EDSA flyovers (including the
    Ayala Avenue flyover), the SKYWAY, Rockwell and
    Glorietta 4, the Fort, NAIA terminal 2 and most of the
    new skyscrapers were not yet built in 1995.

  3. If you drive to the provinces, you will notice that
    national roads are now of good quality (international
    quality asphalt roads). I just went to Iba, Zambales
    last week and I was impressed that even a not so
    frequently travelled road was of very good quality.

  4. Philippine exports have increased by 600% over the
    past eight years. There are many, many more examples
    of progress over the last eight years. Philippine
    mangoes are now exported to the US and Europe.

Additional tidbits to make our people prouder:

  1. INTEL has been in the Philippines for 28 years. The
    Philippines plant is where Intel’s most advanced
    products are launched, including the Pentium IV. By
    the end of 2002, Philippine operations are expected to
    be Intel’s biggest assembly and testing operations
    worldwide.

  2. TEXAS INSTRUMENTS has been operating in Baguio for
    over 20 years. The Baguio plant is the largest
    producer of DSP chips in the world. DSP chips are the
    brains behind cellphones. TI’s Baguio plant produces
    the chip that powers 100% of all NOKIA cellphones and
    80% of Erickson cellphones in the world.

  3. TOSHIBA laptops are produced in Santa Rosa, Laguna.

  4. If you drive a BENZ, BMW, or a VOLVO, there is a
    good chance that the ABS system in your car was made in the Philippines.

  5. TREND-MICRO, makers of one of the top anti virus
    software PC-Cillin (I may have mispelled this)
    develops its “cures” for viruses right here in
    Eastwood Libis, Quezon City. When a virus breaks in
    any computer system in the world, they try to find a
    solution within 45 minutes of finding the virus.

  6. By the end of this year, it is expected that a
    majority of the top ten U.S. Call Center firms in the
    U.S. will have set up operations in the Philippines.
    This is one area in which I believe we are the best in
    the world in terms of value for money.

  7. America Online (AOL) has 1,000 people in Clark
    answering 90% of AOL’s global e-mail inquiries.

  8. PROCTOR & GAMBLE has over 400 people right here in
    Makati (average age 23 years) doing back-up office
    work to their Asian operations including finance
    accounting, Human Resources and payments processing.

  9. Among many other things it does for its regional
    operations network in the Asia-Pacific region here in
    Manila, CITIBANK also does its global ATM programming locally.

  10. This is the first year ever that the Philippines
    will be exporting cars in quantity courtesy of FORD
    Philippines.

  11. The government is shedding off graft and
    corruption slowly but surely. This is the first
    time in our histroy that a former president is in jail
    and facing charges of plunder. Despite all odds, we
    are still pursuing the ill-gotten wealth of Marcos now
    enjoyed by his unrepentant heirs.

Next time you travel abroad and meet business
associates tell them the good news. A big part of our
problem is perception and one of the biggest battles
can be won simply by believing and by making others believe.

This message is shared by good citizens of the
Philippines who persevere to hope and work for our country.

PLEASE PASS THIS ON TO OTHER FILIPINOS!!!

One Ring to rule them all, One Ring to find them,
One Ring to bring them all, & in the Darkness bind them.

puedeng magtanong?

this article was also sent to me about 2 months ago by my cousin in Hawaii.

saan nyo na-acquire ang article na ito?

salamat!

jramar

11-28-2005, 07:24 PM

How much do we love the Philippines?

As you know, we have plenty of Koreans currently
studying in the Philippines to take advantage of our
cheaper tuition fees and learn English at the same
time. This is an essay written by a Korean student
I want to share with you.

My Short Essay about the Philippines
Jaeyoun Kim

Filipinos always complain about the corruption in the
Philippines. Do you really think the corruption is the
problem of the Philippines? I do not think so. I
strongly believe that the problem is the lack of love
for the Philippines.

Let me first talk about my country, Korea. It might
help you understand my point. After the Korean War,
South Kor ea was one of the poorest countries in the
world. Koreans had to start from scratch because
entire country was destroyed completely after the
Korean War, and we had no natural resources.

Koreans used to talk about the Philippines, for
Filipinos were very rich in Asia. We envy Filipinos.
Koreans really wanted to be well off like Filipinos.
Many Koreans died of famine. My father’s brother also
died because of famine.

Korean government was awfully corrupt and is still
very corrupt beyond your imagination, but Korea was
able to develop dramatically because Koreans really
did their best for the common good with their heart
burning with patriotism. Koreans did not work just for
themselves but also for their neighborhood and
country. Education inspired young men with the spirit
of patriotism. 40 years ago, President Park took over
the government to reform Korea.

He tried to borrow money from other countries, but it
w as not possible to get a loan and attract a foreign
investment because the economy situation of South
Korea was so bad. Korea had only BR three factories.
So, President Park sent many mine workers and nurses
to Germany so that they could send money to Korea to
build a factory. They had to go through a horrible
experience. In 1964, President Park visited Germany
to borrow money. Hundred of Koreans in Germany came to
the airport to welcome him and cried there as they saw
the President Park. They asked to him,“President, when
can we be well off?” That was the only question
everyone asked to him. President Park cried with them
and promised them that Korea would be well off if
everyone works hard for Korea, and the President
of Germany got the strong impression on them and lent
money to Korea.

So, President Park was able to build many factories in
Korea.

He always asked Koreans to love their country from
their heart. Many Korean scientists and engineers in
the USA came back to Korea to help developing country
because they wanted their country to be well off.

Though they received very small salary, they did their
best for Korea. They always hoped that their children
would live in well off country.

My parents always brought me to the places where poor
and physically handicapped people live. They wanted me
to understand their life and help them. I also worked
for Catholic Church when I was in the army. The only
thing I learned from Catholic Church was that we have
to love our neighborhood. And I have loved my
neighborhood.

Have you cried for the Philippines? I have cried for
my country several times. I also cried for the
Philippines because of so many poor people. I have
been to the New Bilibid prison. What made me sad in
the prison were the prisoners who do not have any love
for their country. They go to mass and work for
Chur ch. They pray everyday. However, they do not love
the Philippines. I talked to two prisoners at the
maximum security compound, and both of them said that
they would leave the Philippines right after they are
released from the prison. They said that they would
start a new life in other countries and never come
back to the Philippines.

Many Koreans have a great love for Korea so that we
were able to share our wealth with our neighborhood.
The owners of factory and company were distributed
their profit to their employees fairly so that
employees could buy what they needed and saved money
for the future and their children. When I was in
Korea, I had a very strong faith and wanted to be a
priest. However, when I came to the Philippines, I
completely lost my faith. I was very confused when I
saw many unbelievable situations in the Philippines.
Street kids always make me sad, and I see them
everyday. The Philippines is the only Catholic country
in Asia, but there are too many poor people here.
People go to church every Sunday to pray, but nothing
has been changed.

My parents came to the Philippines last week and saw
this situation. They told me that Korea was much
poorer than the present Philippines when they were
young. They are so sorry that there so many beggars
and street kids.

When we went to Pasangjan, I forced my parents to
take a boat because it would fun. However, they were
not happy after taking a boat. They said that they
would not take the boat again because they were
sympathized the boat men, for the boat men were very
poor and had a small frame. Most of people just took a
boat and enjoyed it. But my parents did not enjoy it
because of love for them.

My mother who has been working for Catholic Church
since I was very young told me that if we just go to
mass without changing ourselves, we are not Catholic
indeed. Faith should come with action. She added that
I have to love Filipinos and do good things for them
because all of us are same and have received a great
love from God.

I want Filipinos to love their neighborhood and
country as much as they love God so that the
Philippines will be well off. I am sure that love is
the keyword which Filipinos should remember. We cannot
change the sinful structure at once. It should start
from person. Love must start in everybody in a small
scale and have to grow. A lot of things happen if we
open up to love. Let’s put away our prejudices and
look at our worries with our new eyes. I discover that
every person is worthy to be loved.

Trust in love, because it makes changes possible. Love
changes you and me.

It changes people, contexts and relationships.

It changes the world. Please love your neighborhood
and country. Jesus Christ said that whatever we do to
others we do to Him. In the Philippines, there is God
for people who are abused and abandoned. There is God
who is crying for love. If you have a child, teach
them how to love the Philippines. Teach them why
they have to love their neighborhood and country.

You already know that God also will be very happy if
you love others.

That’s all I really want to ask you Filipinos.

Now I will second her/his curiosity. Is the
Philippines worth crying for…

Who will shed tears for the Motherland .

Who will lend a hand to lift her spirit, to hold the
lonely Flag that symbolize her name.

If you love the motherland, it’s just a click to
spread this message.

Chibi

11-28-2005, 09:23 PM

:king: How much do we love the Philippines?

As you know, we have plenty of Koreans currently
studying in the Philippines to take advantage of our
cheaper tuition fees and learn English at the same
time. This is an essay written by a Korean student
I want to share with you.

My Short Essay about the Philippines
Jaeyoun Kim

Filipinos always complain about the corruption in the
Philippines. Do you really think the corruption is the
problem of the Philippines? I do not think so. I
strongly believe that the problem is the lack of love
for the Philippines.

Let me first talk about my country, Korea. It might
help you understand my point. After the Korean War,
South Kor ea was one of the poorest countries in the
world. Koreans had to start from scratch because
entire country was destroyed completely after the
Korean War, and we had no natural resources.

Koreans used to talk about the Philippines, for
Filipinos were very rich in Asia. We envy Filipinos.
Koreans really wanted to be well off like Filipinos.
Many Koreans died of famine. My father’s brother also
died because of famine.

Korean government was awfully corrupt and is still
very corrupt beyond your imagination, but Korea was
able to develop dramatically because Koreans really
did their best for the common good with their heart
burning with patriotism. Koreans did not work just for
themselves but also for their neighborhood and
country. Education inspired young men with the spirit
of patriotism. 40 years ago, President Park took over
the government to reform Korea.

He tried to borrow money from other countries, but it
w as not possible to get a loan and attract a foreign
investment because the economy situation of South
Korea was so bad. Korea had only BR three factories.
So, President Park sent many mine workers and nurses
to Germany so that they could send money to Korea to
build a factory. They had to go through a horrible
experience. In 1964, President Park visited Germany
to borrow money. Hundred of Koreans in Germany came to
the airport to welcome him and cried there as they saw
the President Park. They asked to him,“President, when
can we be well off?” That was the only question
everyone asked to him. President Park cried with them
and promised them that Korea would be well off if
everyone works hard for Korea, and the President
of Germany got the strong impression on them and lent
money to Korea.

So, President Park was able to build many factories in
Korea.

He always asked Koreans to love their country from
their heart. Many Korean scientists and engineers in
the USA came back to Korea to help developing country
because they wanted their country to be well off.

Though they received very small salary, they did their
best for Korea. They always hoped that their children
would live in well off country.

My parents always brought me to the places where poor
and physically handicapped people live. They wanted me
to understand their life and help them. I also worked
for Catholic Church when I was in the army. The only
thing I learned from Catholic Church was that we have
to love our neighborhood. And I have loved my
neighborhood.

Have you cried for the Philippines? I have cried for
my country several times. I also cried for the
Philippines because of so many poor people. I have
been to the New Bilibid prison. What made me sad in
the prison were the prisoners who do not have any love
for their country. They go to mass and work for
Chur ch. They pray everyday. However, they do not love
the Philippines. I talked to two prisoners at the
maximum security compound, and both of them said that
they would leave the Philippines right after they are
released from the prison. They said that they would
start a new life in other countries and never come
back to the Philippines.

Many Koreans have a great love for Korea so that we
were able to share our wealth with our neighborhood.
The owners of factory and company were distributed
their profit to their employees fairly so that
employees could buy what they needed and saved money
for the future and their children. When I was in
Korea, I had a very strong faith and wanted to be a
priest. However, when I came to the Philippines, I
completely lost my faith. I was very confused when I
saw many unbelievable situations in the Philippines.
Street kids always make me sad, and I see them
everyday. The Philippines is the only Catholic country
in Asia, but there are too many poor people here.
People go to church every Sunday to pray, but nothing
has been changed.

My parents came to the Philippines last week and saw
this situation. They told me that Korea was much
poorer than the present Philippines when they were
young. They are so sorry that there so many beggars
and street kids.

When we went to Pasangjan, I forced my parents to
take a boat because it would fun. However, they were
not happy after taking a boat. They said that they
would not take the boat again because they were
sympathized the boat men, for the boat men were very
poor and had a small frame. Most of people just took a
boat and enjoyed it. But my parents did not enjoy it
because of love for them.

My mother who has been working for Catholic Church
since I was very young told me that if we just go to
mass without changing ourselves, we are not Catholic
indeed. Faith should come with action. She added that
I have to love Filipinos and do good things for them
because all of us are same and have received a great
love from God.

I want Filipinos to love their neighborhood and
country as much as they love God so that the
Philippines will be well off. I am sure that love is
the keyword which Filipinos should remember. We cannot
change the sinful structure at once. It should start
from person. Love must start in everybody in a small
scale and have to grow. A lot of things happen if we
open up to love. Let’s put away our prejudices and
look at our worries with our new eyes. I discover that
every person is worthy to be loved.

Trust in love, because it makes changes possible. Love
changes you and me.

It changes people, contexts and relationships.

It changes the world. Please love your neighborhood
and country. Jesus Christ said that whatever we do to
others we do to Him. In the Philippines, there is God
for people who are abused and abandoned. There is God
who is crying for love. If you have a child, teach
them how to love the Philippines. Teach them why
they have to love their neighborhood and country.

You already know that God also will be very happy if
you love others.

That’s all I really want to ask you Filipinos.

Now I will second her/his curiosity. Is the
Philippines worth crying for…

Who will shed tears for the Motherland .

Who will lend a hand to lift her spirit, to hold the
lonely Flag that symbolize her name.

If you love the motherland, it’s just a click to
spread this message.
speechless ako ah!!!:thumb:Opppppss ss… ang daming tinamaan!!!

rangerXLT

11-28-2005, 09:34 PM

Ako Proud talaga! yun nga lang nakakalungkot talaga ang sitwasyon ng ating bansa ngyn. Balak ko nga pag graduate ko eh mag aarala ko ng abogasya at mag politiko para may maitulong ako sa pag angat ng ating bansa. haaaaayyyyyy…